July 2000 Edition

  • Designing out crime

    Community surveys have indicated that Gosnells residents see reduced crime and increased safety as top priority in terms of what Local Government can achieve for them. Accordingly, Gosnells has undertaken a number of steps to increase personal safety and reduce the perception of crime.
  • Seniors safe and independent

    The issue of greatest concern for Gosnells residents, identified in community surveys, was personal safety. This was particularly the case with older residents. Although the City of Gosnells experiences lower than average crime, a perception of high crime rates was interfering with people's ability to live life fully.
  • Out, about and together in Gosnells

    The City of Gosnells runs various community programs to bring people out of their homes and come together in their neighbourhood. This gives people a chance to 'own' public spaces, to meet other people and, above all, have fun.
  • A place for youth

    When Youth Officer Lisa May first proposed to create a Youth Centre in the Gosnells area she encountered some suspicion and fear. This was particularly the case for residents located near the proposed Centre.
  • Cities for climate protection

    Gosnells, along with its neighbouring City of Armadale and Shire of Serpentine- Jarrahdale, have been recognised with an award for their contribution to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The three Councils have developed a regional approach to the Cities for Climate Protection program.
  • Community Sponsorship Program brings returns

    Gosnells' Sponsorship and Funding Officer, Patrick Quigley, is responsible for managing requests for financial assistance from the community, under Council's Community Sponsorship Program. He explained that Gosnells has formalised the approach to considering financial requests with this sponsorship program, which has a specific budget and sponsorship criteria.
  • Keeping Gosnells in the shade

    One of the most exciting developments for the long term benefit of Whitehorse, and the eastern region of metropolitan Melbourne, is the creation of new Botanic Gardens.
  • EHOs no longer the enemy

    In the absence of stricter legislative controls, Gosnells' Environmental Health Officer, Harvy Walkerden, believes the FoodSafe program is the perfect way to ensure food hygiene standards.
  • Rates card for easy payments

    Queensland's Logan City Council has made rates payment easier for residents through a barcoded rates card.
  • Automated maintenance management

    With the aim of effectively prioritising maintenance expenditure, and carrying it out efficiently, Sutherland Shire in Sydney's south has developed an activity based costing model for its civil maintenance operation.
  • Internet age solutions

    While it is essential for corporate Australia to adopt web related business strategies there is no need to spend substantial amounts on new financial systems or eliminate existing technology, according to Malachy Smith CEO of QSP Group Global Headquarters (UK).
  • Totally integrated Council system

    According to the City of Yarra's Chief Financial Officer, Michael Sedgman, last December when Council selected Computron's Financial Management System it was not just wanting a software supplier but a real business partnership which would run for the life of the system and beyond.
  • Road maintenance a matter of strategy

    The introduction of new accounting regulations AAS27 led to the recognition by many Councils that depreciation of their infrastructure assets was a major problem.
  • Residents opt for higher rates to get facilities now

    Facilities and improvements worth $70 million are close to completion in Gosford after residents overwhelmingly opted to pay higher rates rather than wait years for the changes.
  • Asset valuation streamlined

    In 1995, when Warwick Shire Council decided to revamp its asset management system an extensive process began. The project has put in place a system where information is available to all Council staff to assist in maintenance works, future planning and budgeting, and resolving customer enquires.
  • A better way for Gosnells

    As we enter the 21st century, the City of Gosnells is on course to create a new and better way of life for residents and visitors. Approximately 17 kilometres south east from the centre of Perth's CBD, Gosnells sits on the fringe of suburbia with large areas still to be developed.
  • Restarting the heart

    The robust nature of Local Government is such that unanimous agreement on anything is a rarity, according to Mayor Pat Morris.
  • Promoting business

    Included in the new Civic Centre complex as part of the City Centre Revitalisation Plan will be a Centre for Business Development to 'incubate' and grow local businesses.
  • Planning with a purpose

    "If you want to get a good return from an investment you need to first work out where you want to go," said City of Gosnells' Director Strategic Planning, Stuart Jardine.
  • Creating liveable neighbourhoods

    Under the Western Australian Community Design Code being trialed by the WA Planning Commission, urban development can now embody the international principles of 'New Urbanism'. This is a return to traditional development that creates compact, robust and pedestrian friendly urban environments.
  • Renewal on a suburb wide scale

    Part of plans to renew the City to improve safety and community amenity includes enhancement works in older suburbs.

  • Adelaide on centre stage for World Environment Day

    For World Environment Day on 5 June, nations around the world focused on the City of Adelaide as this year's international host city for the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP). Delegates from more than 20 countries gathered in Adelaide for the United Nations' official World Environment Day Program and associated events.
  • Cityıs vision for the environment

    Building on its strong commitment to environmental issues, the Adelaide City Council as part of its World Environment Day celebrations recently launched its newly revised Environment Management Plan &endash; Local Agenda 21.
  • Improved services from community partnership

    Centrelink recently opened its first office located in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory.
  • Olympic Torch Festival a great success

    The three day 'Keep The Spirit Alive' Olympic Torch Festival, aimed to provide students from across Central Australia with a once in a lifetime opportunity to share the spirit of the Olympics first hand. Timed to coincide with the Olympic Torch Relay's journey through Central Australia, on Wednesday 7 June and Thursday 8 June, over 60 activities for students aimed to capture part of the Olympic excitement and its ideals.
  • Editorial

    With the eyes of the world soon to be focused on our nation with the staging of the Sydney Olympics, recent events have demonstrated a groundswell of support for reconciliation. Speaking at the recent Institute of Municipal Management National Congress, Marketing Guru, Bob Pritchard, said that we have been receiving considerable flack from overseas, but with the estimated 250,000 people walking across Sydney Harbour Bridge, the 'true Australia is now being promoted overseas'.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Brian Hurn, President of the Local Government Association of South Australia.
  • Cluster for growth

    South Australia's City of Playford is working with local producers to look at the pros and cons of declaring the Virginia area a Horticultural Precinct. Situated on Adelaide's fringe, its rich food producing area of Virginia has outstanding features that can match anything elsewhere in Australia.
  • 'Mow a CEO' for a worthy cause

    The Queensland Division of the Institute of Municipal Management launched the 'Mow A CEO' fund raising drive, on behalf of the Make A Wish Foundation, at its State Conference last October.
  • Awards recognise efforts to improve community safety

    From flood recovery processes to innovations in firefighting, the entries in this year's Emergency Management Australia (EMA) Safer Communities Awards have shown excellence in many areas of emergency management.
  • Cluster led economic development is not a fad

    How often we forget that capacity building at the local level is achieved by maximising local advantages and having the people on the ground to connect the dots. The same problem surfaces overseas, which is why numerous development agencies in Europe and the USA are busy facilitating the development of industry clusters &endash; each specialising in building on the inherent advantages of their local communities.
  • SA still at forefront with women as elected representatives

    Susan Grace Benny was Australia's first woman politician, becoming a member of South Australia's Brighton Council late in 1919 &endash; only weeks after Nancy Astor's celebrated election to the British Parliament.
  • International Cities and Town Centres Conference

    The International Cities and Town Centres Conference will be staged in Hobart from 3-6 September 2000. As the second oldest city in Australia, Tasmania's capital offers a great blend of heritage, lifestyle, scenery and vibrant culture.

  • Community Sponsorship Program brings returns

    Gosnells' Sponsorship and Funding Officer, Patrick Quigley, is responsible for managing requests for financial assistance from the community, under Council's Community Sponsorship Program. He explained that Gosnells has formalised the approach to considering financial requests with this sponsorship program, which has a specific budget and sponsorship criteria.
  • Keeping Gosnells in the shade

    The alarming increase in the number of Australians suffering melanomas and other forms of skin cancer has particular meaning in Western Australia which enjoys a good share of this country's sunshine. This has prompted Gosnells, in conjunction with the Western Australian Cancer Foundation, to be the first Council in this state to introduce an official shade policy.
  • EHOs no longer the enemy

    In the absence of stricter legislative controls, Gosnells' Environmental Health Officer, Harvy Walkerden, believes the FoodSafe program is the perfect way to ensure food hygiene standards.
  • Residents opt for higher rates to get facilities now

    Facilities and improvements worth $70 million are close to completion in Gosford after residents overwhelmingly opted to pay higher rates rather than wait years for the changes.
  • Automated maintenance management

    With the aim of effectively prioritising maintenance expenditure, and carrying it out efficiently, Sutherland Shire in Sydney's south has developed an activity based costing model for its civil maintenance operation. Under the system, known as the Maintenance Management and Job Costing system, work teams using palm top computers log details of works required.
  • Totally integrated Council system

    According to the City of Yarra's Chief Financial Officer, Michael Sedgman, last December when Council selected Computron's Financial Management System it was not just wanting a software supplier but a real business partnership which would run for the life of the system and beyond.
  • Internet age solutions

    While it is essential for corporate Australia to adopt web related business strategies there is no need to spend substantial amounts on new financial systems or eliminate existing technology, according to Malachy Smith CEO of QSP Group Global Headquarters (UK).
  • Road maintenance a matter of strategy

    The introduction of new accounting regulations AAS27 led to the recognition by many Councils that depreciation of their infrastructure assets was a major problem.
  • A better way for Gosnells

    As we enter the 21st century, the City of Gosnells is on course to create a new and better way of life for residents and visitors. Approximately 17 kilometres south east from the centre of Perth's CBD, Gosnells sits on the fringe of suburbia with large areas still to be developed. With over 40 percent of its area earmarked for future development, Council is determined that this development will meet community needs and aspirations for the future.
  • Restarting the heart

    The robust nature of Local Government is such that unanimous agreement on anything is a rarity, according to Mayor Pat Morris. With large regional centres on either side of the City, Council had a task ahead of it to win backing for its ambitious 'Revitalisation of the Gosnells Town Centre Scheme'.
  • Promoting business

    Included in the new Civic Centre complex as part of the City Centre Revitalisation Plan will be a Centre for Business Development to 'incubate' and grow local businesses.
  • Planning with a purpose

    Bringing with him an international background in strategic planning and urban regeneration, Stuart Jardine came to Gosnells with the aim of moving the City forward through a strategic plan that had widespread community support.
  • Creating liveable neighbourhoods

    Under the Western Australian Community Design Code being trialed by the WA Planning Commission, urban development can now embody the international principles of 'New Urbanism'. This is a return to traditional development that creates compact, robust and pedestrian friendly urban environments.
  • Renewal on a suburb wide scale

    Part of plans to renew the City to improve safety and community amenity includes enhancement works in older suburbs.
  • Designing out crime

    Community surveys have indicated that Gosnells residents see reduced crime and increased safety as top priority in terms of what Local Government can achieve for them. Accordingly, Gosnells has undertaken a number of steps to increase personal safety and reduce the perception of crime. One of these is a new approach to City design.
  • Seniors safe and independent

    The issue of greatest concern for Gosnells residents, identified in community surveys, was personal safety. This was particularly the case with older residents. Although the City of Gosnells experiences lower than average crime, a perception of high crime rates was interfering with people's ability to live life fully.
  • Out, about and together in Gosnells

    The City of Gosnells runs various community programs to bring people out of their homes and come together in their neighbourhood. This gives people a chance to 'own' public spaces, to meet other people and, above all, have fun.
  • A place for youth

    When Youth Officer Lisa May first proposed to create a Youth Centre in the Gosnells area she encountered some suspicion and fear. This was particularly the case for residents located near the proposed Centre. Through a series of community forums many of those who originally objected are now the Centre's biggest supporters.
  • Cities for climate protection

    Gosnells, along with its neighbouring City of Armadale and Shire of Serpentine- Jarrahdale, have been recognised with an award for their contribution to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The three Councils have developed a regional approach to the Cities for Climate Protection program.

  • Strategies for a new era

    The Institute of Municipal Management's 19th National Congress and Expo was staged in Melbourne on 28-31 May. This was the first time this event has been held outside the national capital.
  • Newcastle wins Management Challenge

    Newcastle City Council has won the 2000 Australasian Active Learning Management Challenge. Representing New South Wales, the Newcastle team defeated seven other regional finalists from the other States, Northern Territory and New Zealand.
  • Editorial

    With the eyes of the world soon to be focused on our nation with the staging of the Sydney Olympics, recent events have demonstrated a groundswell of support for reconciliation. Through the numerous events staged around the nation as part of Corroboree 2000, people have sent a clear message to governments that a settlement between Indigenous and non Indigenous Australians is vital.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Lynn Mason, President Local Government Association of Tasmania.
  • Awards recognise efforts to improve community safety

    From flood recovery processes to innovations in firefighting, the entries in this year's Emergency Management Australia (EMA) Safer Communities Awards have shown excellence in many areas of emergency management.
  • Glenorchy wins gold award

    Glenorchy City Council has taken out the Gold Award at the annual Local Government Awards for Excellence 2000 organised by the Local Government Association of Tasmania. The Award was won for the City's Community Plan, which also took out the Management Practice/Innovation category.
  • Building collaborative, inclusive communities

    President of the Local Government Association of Tasmania, Mayor Lynn Mason, said that the key theme to come out of the 88th Local Government Annual Conference was that successful Councils are those that include their citizens.
  • Cluster led economic development is not a fad

    How often we forget that capacity building at the local level is achieved by maximising local advantages and having the people on the ground to connect the dots. The same problem surfaces overseas, which is why numerous development agencies in Europe and the USA are busy facilitating the development of industry clusters &endash; each specialising in building on the inherent advantages of their local communities.