April 2000 Edition

  • Bigger than the Olympics

    In October 2001 Newcastle will become the first city outside a capital city to host the Australian Masters Games. This will be the eighth time this popular biennial event has been staged.
  • Turning challenges into opportunities

    In 1997, when BHP announced it would be stopping all steel production at its Newcastle plant the natural initial reaction was 'gloom and doom'. However, according to Lord Mayor John Tate, the contrary has happened with a host of new opportunities presenting themselves, not the least being tourism and environmental advancements.
  • Emphasising the 'new' in Newcastle

    According to General Manager, Janet Dore, Newcastle is definitely experiencing a renaissance. The emphasis is very much on the 'new' in Newcastle - new opportunities, new ideas, new confidence and, most of all, a new era of cooperation.
  • Top value organisation

    The high level of professional excellence among Council staff is reflected in a number of innovative projects.
  • Cooperation the key to growth and prosperity

    Speaking at the 'Newcastle Goes National Day' in Canberra last October, the Lord Mayor was one of several Hunter region ambassadors talking to Federal Government representatives about the challenges and opportunities facing this area. He pointed out that with over half a million people, in population terms, the Hunter is Australia's largest region.
  • A change of course for Steel River

    A 100 hectare redevelopment of surplus industrial land, known as Steel River, is a prime example of the new direction Newcastle is taking in the wake of industrial restructuring.
  • McGreen and clean in Newcastle

    The local environment is benefiting from a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between McDonald's Australia and Newcastle City Council, a first for Australia.
  • Reclaiming early history

    Emerging from its historical identity as a centre of Australian heavy industry, Newcastle is aiming to preserve that history. It has also looked further back to its period as a convict settlement.
  • Harbourside development set to take off

    Fifty hectares of surplus State Government land, adjacent to the city centre and running along Newcastle's picturesque Harbour, is ripe for development. Angus Dawson, General Manager of the State Government's Honeysuckle Development Corporation, believes that in the next five to ten years this project has the potential to generate 5,000 jobs and inject $900 million into the local economy.
  • Celluloid substitutes for steel

    Attune to the changing structure of industry in Australia, Newcastle has seized on the growing demand for Australian film and television production.
  • Council's green techniques save money and the environment

    In August 1999, Newcastle launched the first Australian Municipal Energy Improvement Facility(AMEIF), green energy learning centre run by Local Government. The centre is the culmination of Newcastle's Green Energy Project, which commenced in 1995.
  • Promoting the environment message to residents

    While Council is ensuring green initiatives are a cornerstone of its own activities and a requirement for new developments, it is also seeking to bring the community on board.
  • Newcastle Foodsafe

    With the City looking to enhance its tourism potential, having top quality eateries is a priority. Newcastle FoodSafeTM provides a hygiene training course to ensure food handlers are aware of ways to minimise the chances of food contamination.
  • Setting the pace in water management

    Wide Bay Water, the business unit of Queensland's Hervey Bay City Council, is recognised both nationally and internationally for its expertise in water management. By providing innovative solutions to age old water problems, in 1998 it won the National Award for Innovation in Local Government. Placing a high priority on its investment in skills development, Wide Bay Water is set to further enhance its reputation.
  • Subdivison benefits from engineering initiatives

    Highfields, located 15km north of Toowoomba, is Crow's Nest Shire's main population centre. Further growth is expected as a new medium residential development area is subdivided. The Highfields subdivision, constructed by Crow's Nest Shire Council's day labour work force, contains a number of other firsts for the Shire.
  • Fresh approach to asset management

    In 1998 the newly formed City of Onkaparinga set out to develop a new approach to asset management. The aim was to deliver better and more cost efficient use of the City's assets bringing additional benefits to residents and other stakeholders.
  • Planning better cities

    The Centre for Developing Cities, based at the University of Canberra, draws on Australia's significant achievements in urban management, and on international skills and experience to provide a program of education, research and consultancy. This program is aimed at ensuring that sustainable, quality urban development can be achieved even in circumstances of very rapid growth, increased reliance on private investment and a much reduced dire role for governments.
  • Managing the environment on a shoestring

    Mention environmental management to Local Government managers, who are struggling to find the money to maintain their roads and provide other basic services, and they can age visibly. 'It may be important, but we just don't have the resources', is a common reaction. However, what many Councils are now realising is that there are various innovative ways to improve the environment on a small budget and these improvements can save money.

  • International profile for LG in South Australia

    The newly formed South Australian Local Government Consulting Group has won tenders for two international projects, working with the Governments of the Philippines and Sri Lanka. The tendering successes are a triumph for the Government Services Export Unit set up to bring export dollars into the State. Together the two projects are worth over half a million dollars.
  • Beaudesert Shire Council wins Planning Award

    Queensland's Beaudesert Shire has won an Award from the Association of Consulting Surveyors for its handling of development applications. Chairman of the Association Brian Hillam said Beaudesert's high rating was due to the people within Council.
  • Editorial

    With some 300 delegates attending the inaugural National Rural Roads Congress held recently in Moree, the message was loud and clear, action is required now. Put simply, the bulk of our rural roads, built post 1945 to serve expanding rural industries, are reaching the end of their economic life and desperately need reinvestment.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Jamie Edwards, President Western Australian Municipal Association.
  • Bill redraft to give Councils more say

    The Western Australian Municipal Association has welcomed an announcement by the new Minister for the Arts, Mike Broad, that the proposed Culture, Library and the Arts Bill will be redrafted to include greater input from Local Government.
  • Community Services with the morning news

    An initiative to publicise the activities and events organised by Rockhampton City Council's Community Services team has resulted in a handy pocket sized calendar. This is distributed each month with Rockhampton's daily newspaper the Morning Bulletin.
  • Schools in the Centre embrace Olympic spirit

    They may be a long way from Sydney but students in central Australia are nonetheless enthusiastically celebrating the Olympic Games and its ideals of coming together in fair competition and striving to do one's best. Alice Springs Town Council's Olympic Torch Committee is encouraging this interest with the staging of the 'Keep the Spirit Alive Olympic Torch Festival'.
  • Urban community bank

    Perth's City of Bayswater is set to head along the path already trodden by many rural Councils, establishing the first suburban community bank in Western Australia.
  • Moreton Bay to benefit from Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade

    The health of Moreton Bay, and those who use it, will enjoy greater protection with a $16 million upgrade of the Redcliffe Wastewater Treatment Plant. The upgrade was commenced in February with Redcliffe Mayor Alan Boulton turning the first piece of soil for the Biological Nutrient Removal(BNR) plant.
  • Adelaide to take world stage with environment agenda

    The City of Adelaide will play host to a range of international delegates, visitors and media when the main international event for World Environment Day is held there on 5 June. Adelaide has been selected to host the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), providing a once in a lifetime opportunity to showcase the City internationally as a place with a healthy and sustainable environment.
  • A National Training Package for LG

    The National Local Government Training Package was endorsed by the National Training Framework Committee on 6 March 2000 and agreed by State, Territory and Commonwealth, Vocational, Education and Training Ministers on 21 March 2000.
  • The good oil - economic capacity in regional Australia

    The Commonwealth Government is due to announce a major package to respond to deep seated disenchantment in regional Australia. The dollar figures will be significant, and the Opposition is sure to make accusations about pork barrelling.

  • A change of course for Steel River

    A 100 hectare redevelopment of surplus industrial land, known as Steel River, is a prime example of the new direction Newcastle is taking in the wake of industrial restructuring.
  • McGreen and clean in Newcastle

    The local environment is benefiting from a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between McDonald's Australia and Newcastle City Council, a first for Australia.
  • Reclaiming early history

    Emerging from its historical identity as a centre of Australian heavy industry, Newcastle is aiming to preserve that history. It has also looked further back to its period as a convict settlement.
  • Harbourside development set to take off

    Fifty hectares of surplus State Government land, adjacent to the city centre and running along Newcastle's picturesque Harbour, is ripe for development. Angus Dawson, General Manager of the State Government's Honeysuckle Development Corporation, believes that in the next five to ten years this project has the potential to generate 5,000 jobs and inject $900 million into the local economy.
  • Celluloid substitutes for steel

    Attune to the changing structure of industry in Australia, Newcastle has seized on the growing demand for Australian film and television production.
  • Council's green techniques save money and the environment

    In August 1999, Newcastle launched the first Australian Municipal Energy Improvement Facility(AMEIF), green energy learning centre run by Local Government. The centre is the culmination of Newcastle's Green Energy Project, which commenced in 1995.
  • Promoting the environment message to residents

    While Council is ensuring green initiatives are a cornerstone of its own activities and a requirement for new developments, it is also seeking to bring the community on board.
  • Newcastle Foodsafe

    With the City looking to enhance its tourism potential, having top quality eateries is a priority. Newcastle FoodSafeTM provides a hygiene training course to ensure food handlers are aware of ways to minimise the chances of food contamination.
  • Setting the pace in water management

    Wide Bay Water, the business unit of Queensland's Hervey Bay City Council, is recognised both nationally and internationally for its expertise in water management. By providing innovative solutions to age old water problems, in 1998 it won the National Award for Innovation in Local Government. Placing a high priority on its investment in skills development, Wide Bay Water is set to further enhance its reputation.
  • Making waves in Mildura

    Sufficient cement to fill Mildura Rural City Council's existing Olympic swimming pool twice over has been used to complete Stage 2 of the City's landmark Alfred Deakin Centre. Just in time for one of the hottest summers on record, the opening of the Aquatic Centre on 21 February brings to fruition Mildura's vision for a centrally located multi purpose complex.
  • Planning better cities

    The Centre for Developing Cities, based at the University of Canberra, draws on Australia's significant achievements in urban management, and on international skills and experience to provide a program of education, research and consultancy. This program is aimed at ensuring that sustainable, quality urban development can be achieved even in circumstances of very rapid growth, increased reliance on private investment and a much reduced direc role for governments.
  • Road Safety Grants for New South Wales Councils

    In February Motor Accidents Authority General Manager David Bowen met with the Board of the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia (IPWEA-NSW Division) to announce funding over three years for Council road safety activity, including the IPWEA/RTA Local Government Road Safety Project Grants Scheme. This grant scheme aims to foster road safety strategic planning and effective road safety activity with a behavioural or education focus in Councils across NSW.
  • Managing the environment on a shoestring

    Mention environmental management to Local Government managers, who are struggling to find the money to maintain their roads and provide other basic services, and they can age visibly. 'It may be important, but we just don't have the resources', is a common reaction. However, what many Councils are now realising is that there are various innovative ways to improve the environment on a small budget and these improvements can save money.
  • Bayside's clean, safe beaches

    Beaches are a wonderful amenity but if not properly cared for they can be a health hazard both in and out of the water. Problems of water contamination from storm water outlets are now superseded by fear of needle stick injuries from syringes buried in sand.
  • Smarter, greener, cleaner

    Queanbeyan residents are enjoying a new waste management system introduced in March. Under the new system, residents now have a three bin service.
  • Bigger than the Olympics

    In October 2001 Newcastle will become the first city outside a capital city to host the Australian Masters Games. This will be the eighth time this popular biennial event has been staged.
  • Turning challenges into opportunities

    In 1997, when BHP announced it would be stopping all steel production at its Newcastle plant the natural initial reaction was 'gloom and doom'. However, according to Lord Mayor John Tate, the contrary has happened with a host of new opportunities presenting themselves, not the least being tourism and environmental advancements.
  • Emphasising the 'new' in Newcastle

    According to General Manager, Janet Dore, Newcastle is definitely experiencing a renaissance. The emphasis is very much on the 'new' in Newcastle - new opportunities, new ideas, new confidence and, most of all, a new era of cooperation.
  • Top value organisation

    The high level of professional excellence among Council staff is reflected in a number of innovative projects.
  • Cooperation the key to growth and prosperity

    Speaking at the 'Newcastle Goes National Day' in Canberra last October, the Lord Mayor was one of several Hunter region ambassadors talking to Federal Government representatives about the challenges and opportunities facing this area. He pointed out that with over half a million people, in population terms, the Hunter is Australia's largest region.

  • A new agenda for Victoria

    In opening the Local Government Professionals Annual Conference, Victorian Minister for Local Government, Bob Cameron, said the Conference theme, 'A New Agenda' is what is happening across the State.
  • Tailored Executive Development Program for Flinders Island

    The Local Government Association of Tasmania took its Executive Development Program off shore recently, with tailor made workshops for elected representatives and staff at Flinders Island.
  • Editorial

    With some 300 delegates attending the inaugural National Rural Roads Congress held recently in Moree, the message was loud and clear, action is required now. Put simply, the bulk of our rural roads, built post 1945 to serve expanding rural industries, are reaching the end of their economic life and desperately need reinvestment.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Tony Bisdee, President Local Government Association of Tasmania.
  • Advocacy &endash; the real agenda of democratic government

    Local Government is under increasing pressure to undertake advocacy on behalf of its residents according to Managing Director of The Strategy Shop, Michael Henry. Introducing the topic at LGPro's Annual Conference, he said advocacy is the real agenda of democratic government and communities are increasingly wanting Local Government to act on their behalf over many issues.
  • 'Bush telegraph' beats city in communication awards

    Two regional Councils have taken out the 1999 TMP Worldwide/NSW Local Government Excellence in Communication Awards. The Awards, presented at the Local Government Public Relations Association (LGPRA) Annual Conference, held in March, were won by Dubbo and Shellharbour City Councils.
  • Performance through people

    In delivering the keynote address at the LG Pro Annual Conference, Paul Bourke, from Brienburke Business Advisors, said that the single, biggest competitive advantage an organisation can have is 'results orientated people'.
  • Refugees gain a permanent link to Australia

    Kosovar refugees, given shelter in the Tasmanian Haven Centre at Brighton, will have a permanent bond with the Brighton community in the form of a sister city relationship with Kosovo's third largest city, Ferizaj.
  • Bubblemaker - scuba access for children with disabilities

    Warringah City Council's Aquatic Centre has opened up a new world to children with disabilities, with a pilot Bubblemaker session held in March. The Bubblemaker project, based on a highly successful program operating in the United States, gives children with disabilities a safe and fun scuba diving adventure free of charge.
  • Hume City Council welcomes major newspaper group

    Leadership in economic development by Hume City Council has brought The Age's new $220 million press plant to Tullamarine on Melbourne's northern fringe.
  • A National Training Package for LG

    The National Local Government Training Package was endorsed by the National Training Framework Committee on 6 March 2000 and agreed by State, Territory and Commonwealth, Vocational, Education and Training Ministers on 21 March 2000.
  • The good oil - economic capacity in regional Australia

    The Commonwealth Government is due to announce a major package to respond to deep seated disenchantment in regional Australia. The dollar figures will be significant, and the Opposition is sure to make accusations about pork barrelling.