March 2000 Edition

  • Australia's number one drug - local action to reduce alcohol related harm

    Alcohol is an accepted part of Australian culture and the most widely used drug in the 14 years and over age group. About 75% of Australians in this group are current drinkers. Although there is growing recognition of alcohol use as a serious social issue, research indicates that few people regard it as a personal problem. It is seen as more of a problem for others. It was against this background that the Commonwealth Government, with advice from the National Expert Advisory Committee on Alcohol, decided on a national campaign to reduce the level of alcohol related harm.
  • Local Government supports QUILTS 2000

    For the past 12 months, 2,000 quiltmakers and textile artists from across Australia have been busy fundraising, designing and creating the largest quilt collection to be used as a fundraiser anywhere in the world.
  • Editorial

    The recent plight of textile workers in the Hunter Valley, and extensive publicity resulting from the Prime Minister's embroilment in the matter, raise many more issues than have so far captured most media attention. To date, coverage has focused on the immediate needs of the Hunter Valley workers in terms of their redundancy pay outs and other entitlements; the fact that the PM ended up in what has been described as 'a no win situation'; and why these workers are to be assisted while others continue to be denied. Little has been said about the longer term problem, that is, these workers are now unemployed and may have no other option but to move out of the area to find another job.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Brad Matheson, President Municipal Association of Victoria.
  • Young people and crime - Local Government seeks answers

    Recently, the role of Government in youth crime prevention has been highlighted by debate over the morality and effectiveness of mandatory sentencing following a tragic death in the Northern Territory. Tasmania's Glenorchy City Council was already ahead of the discussion, having in early February co hosted a major seminar with the State Government, examining the issue of young people and crime.
  • Shire promotes life long education

    Victoria's Shire of Melton has collaborated with local education providers to ensure Melton residents have access to educational opportunities throughout their lives.
  • Fire and rain - Macedon Expo shows how to manage the threat

    When summer brings hot winds and dry conditions everyone is on fire alert. Unfortunately the same conditions also mean depleted water storage, and hence restrictions on water use, the main means for fighting fires.
  • Warringah residents have their say

    Residents of Sydney's Warringah Council are to have their say in shaping the City's Environmental Strategy. Acting Mayor Phil Colman said this would ensure the strategy 'truly reflects community aspirations on a diverse range of environmental issues'.
  • Whittlesea shades better

    A policy to ensure everyone in the City has adequate protection from the sun's harmful rays has won a Victorian Public Health Award for Victoria's City of Whittlesea. The Shade Policy which deals with the provision of shade at Council owned parks, playgrounds, sporting and recreational facilities and preschools, has also won the endorsement of the Anti Cancer Council of Victoria and the Playgrounds and Recreation Association of Victoria.
  • Unique study strengthens heritage protection in North Sydney

    The adoption of a Cultural Assets & Resources Study and Development Control Plan (DCP) by North Sydney Council highlights the importance of the area's heritage and culture.
  • Murgon Shire fights to save local jobs

    The failure of Federal and State Governments to provide short term funding to keep open the meatworks in Queensland's Murgon Shire, has once again left Local Government to bear the burden of economic development. The closure of the local meatworks early this month has placed nearly 600 workers in the dole queue with possibly more to follow as the flow on effect comes into play.

  • Gold honours for the environment

    Well before the two Councils decided to amalgamate, Armidale and Dumaresq had been cooperating in a number of areas including the highly prized natural environment of the region. A number of initiatives undertaken by both Councils and their communities clearly indicate the importance they place on protecting and conserving the natural environment.
  • Feeling safe wherever you are

    One outcome of Armidale's 'Building the Future' Forum, in 1997, was that community safety is a major concern for many people. As a result, an extensive campaign to improve public safety commenced.
  • Getting young people home safely

    An initiative of the Armidale Aboriginal community to assist young people to get home safely at night has been picked up by Council.
  • Third City of the Arts

    In July last year, Armidale was selected by the State Government as the Third City of the Arts. It joins Katoomba and Broken Hill. With funding of $300,000, the Third City of the Arts Managerial Committee has targeted youth and multiculturalism as key areas of the program.
  • Trolley ride through a rich heritage

    Armidale is justly proud of its built environment. The 'capital of New England' is a gracious leafy city with a wealth of heritage buildings, gardens, educational facilities and cultural experiences. Each year these, together with a moderate climate, attract thousands of visitors to Armidale. To help visitors appreciate all Armidale has to offer, the city runs a free electric powered Heritage Trolley Tour.
  • Centre built to minimise impact on natural environment

    The recently opened Yaraandoo Environmental Interpretive Centre, located on the popular Waterfall Way between Armidale and the NSW coast, represents a complete commitment to the local world heritage listed environment. The Centre provides tourist information, adventure activities, accommodation, a restaurant and convention facilities.
  • Improved access to services for Onslow

    Western Australia's Shire of Ashburton is aiming to increase banking and government services to the Onslow community.
  • Telephone and computer systems linked for quicker service

    South Australia's largest Council, the City of Onkaparinga, has introduced a new customer inquiry system which enables it to reduce an average three minute phone inquiry by 30 to 40 seconds.
  • Digital Dashboard a winner

    The evolution of the roles of Information Technology within Local Authorities has been accompanied by an increase in senior management's expectation of enhanced and faster return on investment. Yet we still hear a common cry of 'all the information's there I just can't get it out and if I do, it's too late'.
  • CivicView's versatility continues to grow

    Australia's leading Local Government software solution, CivicView, has certainly established itself in the Local Government IT marketplace.
  • The right time

    Dumaresq Mayor, Peter Monley firmly believes now is the right time for a merger.
  • Our first new Council of the millennium

    Officially proclaimed on 21 February by New South Wales Governor, Gordon Samuels AC, Armidale Dumaresq Council has become Australia's first new Council of the millennium. Created through the merger of the former Armidale City Council and Dumaresq Shire Council, this is the first voluntary amalgamation in New South Wales following legislation introduced last year by the Minister for Local Government, Harry Woods.
  • Reconciliation is more than flag raising

    Joining Armidale City Council in 1983, Deputy Mayor Pat Dixon was the first Aboriginal woman elected to Local Government in Australia. She believes reconciliation is not simply about flag raising and recognition but a commitment to actions that will lead to a better quality of life.
  • Volunteers gain benefits too

    As most Councils are aware, much valuable work carried out in the community relies on volunteers. To coordinate and recruit volunteers, Council runs the Armidale Regional Volunteer Centre which matches volunteers to the type of work they are interested in according to their skills, interest and experience.
  • Building bridges

    With the twin aims of bringing the community together and restoring the amenity of a picnic area, in 1998 Armidale celebrated Local Government Week by launching a project titled 'Building Bridges across the Community'.
  • Access the key to community life

    With the aim of offering people with a disability the same access to recreation opportunities and to participate fully in community life, Armidale has introduced a Recreational Access Project.
  • Towards a better future

    In response to the rural crisis facing most regional areas, in 1997 Mayors Richard Torbay and Peter Monley formed a Community Taskforce. Issues that needed to be addressed included the population drift, closure of services and an over reliance on one or two industries.
  • Regional airport a showpiece

    Armidale Dumaresq Council is very much the gateway to the New England Tablelands. Many people choose to fly into the area via the recently upgraded Armidale Regional Airport.

  • Local Government supports QUILTS 2000

    For the past 12 months, 2,000 quiltmakers and textile artists from across Australia have been busy fundraising, designing and creating the largest quilt collection to be used as a fundraiser anywhere in the world.
  • Editorial

    The recent plight of textile workers in the Hunter Valley, and extensive publicity resulting from the Prime Minister's embroilment in the matter, raise many more issues than have so far captured most media attention. To date, coverage has focused on the immediate needs of the Hunter Valley workers in terms of their redundancy pay outs and other entitlements; the fact that the PM ended up in what has been described as 'a no win situation'; and why these workers are to be assisted while others continue to be denied. Little has been said about the longer term problem, that is, these workers are now unemployed and may have no other option but to move out of the area to find another job.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Brian Hurn OAM President Local Government Association of South Australia.
  • Children do have a voice

    When five year seven students from a local school in Western Australia's Town of Victoria Park went to Council with a request for a skateboard facility their request was taken seriously. A Community Needs Assessment, which Council had undertaken, had already indicated that there was a need for more facilities and services for young people.
  • Demonstration 'Green House' to give public ideas

    Queensland's Maroochy Shire is taking advantage of the initiative of a local couple who have built a home demonstrating the value of environmentally friendly building techniques.
  • Regional Tourism Conference in the heart of the country

    Where better to hold a regional tourism conference than in the centre of Australia? In April delegates will travel from across Australia to Alice Springs to take part in the National Regional Tourism Conference hosted by Tourism Council Australia.
  • Australia's number one drug - local action to reduce alcohol related harm

    Alcohol is an accepted part of Australian culture and the most widely used drug in the 14 years and over age group. About 75% of Australians in this group are current drinkers. Although there is growing recognition of alcohol use as a serious social issue, research indicates that few people regard it as a personal problem. It is seen as more of a problem for others. It was against this background that the Commonwealth Government, with advice from the National Expert Advisory Committee on Alcohol, decided on a national campaign to reduce the level of alcohol related harm.

  • NetWorking Dog La Trobe's best friend

    An information technology training program developed in partnership by Victoria's La Trobe Shire and Monash University's Centre for Electronic Commerce ensures the benefits of new technology are shared by a much greater number of people, recreating the Gippsland region as an IT aware community.
  • Museums and mice - http://amol.org.au

    What do museums and mice have in common? Through Australian Museums On Line (AMOL), the common mouse can open a path into Australia's museums and galleries. This innovative website is a gateway to Australia's vast heritage collections held in heritage and art museums.
  • CivicView's versatility continues to grow

    Australia's leading Local Government software solution, CivicView, has certainly established itself in the Local Government IT marketplace.
  • The right time

    Dumaresq Mayor, Peter Monley firmly believes now is the right time for a merger.
  • Our first new Council of the millennium

    Officially proclaimed on 21 February by New South Wales Governor, Gordon Samuels AC, Armidale Dumaresq Council has become Australia's first new Council of the millennium. Created through the merger of the former Armidale City Council and Dumaresq Shire Council, this is the first voluntary amalgamation in New South Wales following legislation introduced last year by the Minister for Local Government, Harry Woods.
  • Reconciliation is more than flag raising

    Joining Armidale City Council in 1983, Deputy Mayor Pat Dixon was the first Aboriginal woman elected to Local Government in Australia. She believes reconciliation is not simply about flag raising and recognition but a commitment to actions that will lead to a better quality of life.
  • Volunteers gain benefits too

    As most Councils are aware, much valuable work carried out in the community relies on volunteers. To coordinate and recruit volunteers, Council runs the Armidale Regional Volunteer Centre which matches volunteers to the type of work they are interested in according to their skills, interest and experience.
  • Building bridges

    With the twin aims of bringing the community together and restoring the amenity of a picnic area, in 1998 Armidale celebrated Local Government Week by launching a project titled 'Building Bridges across the Community'.
  • Access the key to community life

    With the aim of offering people with a disability the same access to recreation opportunities and to participate fully in community life, Armidale has introduced a Recreational Access Project.
  • Towards a better future

    In response to the rural crisis facing most regional areas, in 1997 Mayors Richard Torbay and Peter Monley formed a Community Taskforce. Issues that needed to be addressed included the population drift, closure of services and an over reliance on one or two industries.
  • Regional airport a showpiece

    Armidale Dumaresq Council is very much the gateway to the New England Tablelands. Many people choose to fly into the area via the recently upgraded Armidale Regional Airport.
  • Gold honours for the environment

    Well before the two Councils decided to amalgamate, Armidale and Dumaresq had been cooperating in a number of areas including the highly prized natural environment of the region. A number of initiatives undertaken by both Councils and their communities clearly indicate the importance they place on protecting and conserving the natural environment.
  • Feeling safe wherever you are

    One outcome of Armidale's 'Building the Future' Forum, in 1997, was that community safety is a major concern for many people. As a result, an extensive campaign to improve public safety commenced.
  • Getting young people home safely

    An initiative of the Armidale Aboriginal community to assist young people to get home safely at night has been picked up by Council.
  • Third City of the Arts

    In July last year, Armidale was selected by the State Government as the Third City of the Arts. It joins Katoomba and Broken Hill. With funding of $300,000, the Third City of the Arts Managerial Committee has targeted youth and multiculturalism as key areas of the program.
  • Trolley ride through a rich heritage

    Armidale is justly proud of its built environment. The 'capital of New England' is a gracious leafy city with a wealth of heritage buildings, gardens, educational facilities and cultural experiences. Each year these, together with a moderate climate, attract thousands of visitors to Armidale. To help visitors appreciate all Armidale has to offer, the city runs a free electric powered Heritage Trolley Tour.
  • Centre built to minimise impact on natural environment

    The recently opened Yaraandoo Environmental Interpretive Centre, located on the popular Waterfall Way between Armidale and the NSW coast, represents a complete commitment to the local world heritage listed environment. The Centre provides tourist information, adventure activities, accommodation, a restaurant and convention facilities.
  • Greater Geelong weaves untangled web

    The largest regional Municipality in Australia has markedly improved its internal communications in response to employee demand. Council has installed a sophisticated Intranet system named CityWeb.
  • Tas Councils maximise IT benefits

    The Local Government Fund, under the Networking the Nation Program, offers Councils across the country a significant opportunity to propel their communities well into the 21st century through the provision of new ways of doing business with Councils. Tasmanian Councils are accepting the challenge of moving to the online environment.
  • Digital Dashboard a winner

    The evolution of the roles of Information Technology within Local Authorities has been accompanied by an increase in senior management's expectation of enhanced and faster return on investment. Yet we still hear a common cry of 'all the information's there I just can't get it out and if I do, it's too late'.
  • Food safety auditing made easy

    Following changes to the Victorian Food Act, in 1998, Local Government Environmental Health Officers found themselves with a potential administrative headache. Relief has come in the form of AUDIT-Easy.
  • Electronic payments convenient and secure

    With over 30% of its ratepayers living or working elsewhere, Port Stephens Council on the northern NSW coast was quick to adopt electronic payment forms.
  • Excellence in record management

    Victoria's Swan Hill Rural City Council has won the Sir Rupert Hamer Records Management Certificate of Merit for innovation and excellence in records management. The Awards recognise innovation and excellence in records management within the public sector.
  • GST compliance reporting solution

    Computron Software, a global provider of software for business process automation, financial management and business intelligence, has announced an agreement with PKF, a leading specialist chartered accounting and business advisory firm, to provide a GST/Compliance Reporting solution to Australian organisations.