April 1999 Edition

  • Professional and ethical

    Moving to a more outward looking, customer focused approach has required specific training to equip staff with the necessary skills. A key to this has been to ensure that all staff work within an established professional and ethical framework.
  • Regional involvement

    Chief Minister, Kate Carnell, said that her Government is keen to promote the national capital in the context of the broader region. The Australian Capital Region (ACR) comprises the ACT and the surrounding 17 Councils.
  • A healthy community

    As part of its vision for 'A Clever, Caring Capital', the ACT aims to lead Australia in maximising both community and individual health and wellbeing.
  • Optimum service delivery

    The Urban Services Department provides Canberra with the services it needs to function as a city. These include town planning, heritage and environment, waste management, libraries, parks, forests, and roads.
  • Fingertip information and services

    With the ultimate aim of providing equity and access to services, in 1997 the ACT Government launched AUSTOUCH kiosks. The kiosks, located in high pedestrian traffic areas throughout the City, now provide Canberra residents and visitors with 24 hour access to information and bill paying services.
  • Zero waste Canberra's goal

    The introduction of a new waste management service based on contracting has been well received by the Canberra community. It has proved so effective the ACT Government has set an ambitious goal of achieving zero waste by 2010.
  • Commercially sound urban park management

    In 1994, management of Canberra's 5,000 hectares of urban open space, including parks, playgrounds and verges, was identified as an area which could deliver new efficiencies in service delivery under market testing.
  • Increased access to spatial data *

    Many users of digital mapping and spatial information understand the difficulties faced when trying to get hold of spatial data from government agencies. In responding to user needs, the Federal Government mapping agency - AUSLIG, is introducing a number of initiatives to make it much easier to access important spatial data.
  • Jabiru celebrates World Wetlands Day

    February 2 was the anniversary of the signing of the International Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, in Ramsar in 1971. It is of special significance to Jabiru and Australia because Australia was the first signatory to the Ramsar Convention.
  • A city within a park

    Queensland's Maroochy Shire is set to benefit from the development of a farm site which has been owned by one family for the last 100 years. Adjacent to the Maroochydore Central Business District, this major commercial and residential development will have a predominantly green emphasis.
  • Low cost, quality water

    Installation of world first 'Garra' microfiltration unit has improved water quality for residents in NSW's Mulwaree Shire at a fraction of the cost of conventional treatment.
  • Reducing waste improves health and water quality

    Following its creation in 1995, the Town of Cambridge, formerly part of Perth City Council, determined to improve its waste management system. Within a year of the introduction of the new Waste Management System, over 7,000 residences were participating in recycling.
  • Celebrating 10 years of self government

    This year, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) celebrates 10 years of self government. In its first decade of self government, the ACT has undergone a metamorphosis.
  • Concentrating on outputs not processes

    Chief Minister, Kate Carnell, believes that the bureaucratic emphasis on processes belongs in the past. Cutting edge public policy making and administration needs to be geared to outcomes, and these outcomes must mirror what constituents want.
  • Leader in financial management

    On 1 July 1996, the ACT Government became the first Australian public sector organisation to move to accrual budgeting. This, together with other financial management reforms, was designed to achieve best practice using a fully accountable business management approach.
  • Focusing on the customer

    After its election in 1995, the new Government introduced its Customer Commitment Program. The aim was to establish the ACT public service as a model of public administration that puts the customer first.

  • LGA.net launched in SA

    A new intranet for South Australian Councils was launched by Local Government Association President, Mayor Rosemary Craddock, at the LGA's half yearly general meeting in March. Branded 'LGA.net', the system is based on the Local Government Association of Queensland's successful LGAQ Net intranet and will take SA Council networking 'beyond the website'.
  • Giving youth a voice

    Enabling young people to establish and determine the procedures of a Youth Council has been the key to its success. In response to a Needs Analysis survey conducted with local youth, Port Lincoln set up its first Youth Council nine months ago.
  • Editorial

    There is growing community interest in not only celebrating what we have achieved but debating and discussing the challenges that face us as we enter the next century. In spite of a widely held belief, that leadership and vision should permeate from the national level down, across Australia many Councils and their communities are clearly demonstrating that they are not prepared to wait, rather they are already working to meet the challenges, and making the most of opportunities the new millennium has to offer.
  • President's comment

    In each edition, we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Margaret Vigants, President Local Government Association of the Northern Territory.
  • Small Council delivers big social benefits

    Northern Territory's Elliott Community Government Council has not let its size or remote location prevent it having an extensive program of community activity including a wide range of sports. The predominantly Aboriginal community of just 550 residents has a fully equipped gym, a Youth Centre, basketball and tennis courts, and a nine hole golf course.
  • Council meetings to make use of new technology

    The Shire of Ashburton, in north west Western Australia has gained State Government approval to use tele and video conferencing during Council meetings.
  • Councils confront drug issues

    While debate over a drugs policy continues in the Federal and State spheres, Local Government is implementing practical strategies to address the problems of drug use.
  • LG concerns recognised by Accounts Committee

    With the reconvening of Parliament in March, the Western Australian Municipal Association (WAMA) is urging the State Government to take on board the recommendations of the Public Accounts and Expenditure Review Committee regarding State Agreements.
  • Local Government partnership with business

    Local Government bodies are taking an active role in developing information technology systems to provide smoother paths for businesses in their regions. While this has the direct result of streamlining compliance procedures and lowering the cost of transactions, it also has the flow on effect of improving service and delivery standards, providing a technologically integrated environment and trimming transaction times.

  • Fingertip information and services

    With the ultimate aim of providing equity and access to services, in 1997 the ACT Government launched AUSTOUCH kiosks. The kiosks, located in high pedestrian traffic areas throughout the City, now provide Canberra residents and visitors with 24 hour access to information and bill paying services.
  • Zero waste Canberra's goal

    The introduction of a new waste management service based on contracting has been well received by the Canberra community. It has proved so effective the ACT Government has set an ambitious goal of achieving zero waste by 2010.
  • Commercially sound urban park management

    In 1994, management of Canberra's 5,000 hectares of urban open space, including parks, playgrounds and verges, was identified as an area which could deliver new efficiencies in service delivery under market testing.
  • Brighton leads the way in effluent reuse

    Tasmania's Brighton Council plans to expand its innovative effluent reuse program to further benefit private enterprise in the region and protect local rivers from damage. In 1997, Council stopped discharging treated effluent into the Jordan River and instead used it to irrigate pine plantations and local farms.
  • Increased access to spatial data *

    Many users of digital mapping and spatial information understand the difficulties faced when trying to get hold of spatial data from government agencies. In responding to user needs, the Federal Government mapping agency - AUSLIG, is introducing a number of initiatives to make it much easier to access important spatial data.
  • State of the art landfill serves the region

    A state of the art landfill at Corangamite Shire in Victoria will serve the waste management needs of the Shire and the region for the next 30 years.
  • Waste reduction measures

    New waste management measures adopted by NSW's Port Stephens Council, are set to achieve an 80 percent reduction in waste. The system relies on a holistic approach, integrating collection, recycling and disposal into the one system. The aim is to achieve both economic and environmental benefits.
  • New manual for engineers
    Road construction and design is set to be made easier and less costly with the release of a new guidelines manual, 'Pavement Materials in Road Building - making better use of local materials'.
  • Low cost, quality water

    Installation of world first 'Garra' microfiltration unit has improved water quality for residents in NSW's Mulwaree Shire at a fraction of the cost of conventional treatment.
  • Celebrating 10 years of self government

    This year, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) celebrates 10 years of self government. In its first decade of self government, the ACT has undergone a metamorphosis.
  • Concentrating on outputs not processes

    Chief Minister, Kate Carnell, believes that the bureaucratic emphasis on processes belongs in the past. Cutting edge public policy making and administration needs to be geared to outcomes, and these outcomes must mirror what constituents want.
  • Leader in financial management

    On 1 July 1996, the ACT Government became the first Australian public sector organisation to move to accrual budgeting. This, together with other financial management reforms, was designed to achieve best practice using a fully accountable business management approach.
  • Focusing on the customer

    After its election in 1995, the new Government introduced its Customer Commitment Program. The aim was to establish the ACT public service as a model of public administration that puts the customer first.
  • Professional and ethical

    Moving to a more outward looking, customer focused approach has required specific training to equip staff with the necessary skills. A key to this has been to ensure that all staff work within an established professional and ethical framework.
  • Regional involvement

    Chief Minister, Kate Carnell, said that her Government is keen to promote the national capital in the context of the broader region. The Australian Capital Region (ACR) comprises the ACT and the surrounding 17 Councils.
  • A healthy community

    As part of its vision for 'A Clever, Caring Capital', the ACT aims to lead Australia in maximising both community and individual health and wellbeing.
  • Optimum service delivery

    The Urban Services Department provides Canberra with the services it needs to function as a city. These include town planning, heritage and environment, waste management, libraries, parks, forests, and roads.

  • ALGA's submission to the Senate Tax Inquiry

    The Senate Select Committee Inquiry into a New Tax System has been taking submissions in capital cities around the nation. The Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) and its member State LGAs have taken every opportunity to raise a number of concerns on behalf of the 705 Councils and local communities they represent.
  • Councils confront drug issues

    While debate over a drugs policy continues in the Federal and State spheres, Local Government is implementing practical strategies to address the problems of drug use.
  • Editorial

    There is growing community interest in not only celebrating what we have achieved but debating and discussing the challenges that face us as we enter the next century. In spite of a widely held belief, that leadership and vision should permeate from the national level down, across Australia many Councils and their communities are clearly demonstrating that they are not prepared to wait, rather they are already working to meet the challenges, and making the most of opportunities the new millennium has to offer.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Anthony Bisdee, President Local Government Association of Tasmania.
  • New development for older area

    It is not often that older established municipalities have the opportunity to plan new developments within their borders. However, deinstitutionalisation has given Victoria's Darebin City Council such a chance.
  • Reestablishing bank services in rural areas

    The current trend for banks to close personal banking services can be much more than an inconvenience. In rural areas, it can have a cumulative effect, leading to business closures, loss of income and general decline in local towns. This has prompted some small towns to muster their resources to reestablish local services directing the profits to their own long term future.
  • Revitalising Liverpool's CBD

    Extensive consultation with residents, business people, bus companies and road users has resulted in strong support for work to recommence on the ring road around Liverpool's CBD.
  • Will your infrastructure stand up to climate change?

    Changing weather patterns may require Councils to reconsider their provision of infrastructure. Brian Edwards, Manager Technical Services, at Kingborough Council in southern Tasmania said higher than average rainfall in recent years has caused Council's Technical Services Department to take a serious look at its systems including stormwater, sewerage and water supply.
  • Local Government partnership with business

    Local Government bodies are taking an active role in developing information technology systems to provide smoother paths for businesses in their regions. While this has the direct result of streamlining compliance procedures and lowering the cost of transactions, it also has the flow on effect of improving service and delivery standards, providing a technologically integrated environment and trimming transaction times.