March 1999 Edition

  • Warning to maintain vigilance on Y2K

    At South Australia's City of Port Adelaide Enfield, the Y2K problem is seen as essentially a business issue not just an IT issue. While many Councils are heavily reliant on IT systems, these are relatively easy to manage. It is areas which use computer controlled processes such as traffic lights or swimming pool chlorination systems, which must be examined critically.
  • Ku-ring-gai provides services online with IBM E-business solution

    Residents in Ku-ring-gai Council will soon be able to interact with discussion groups, make requests for information and, in time, even submit development applications and book tennis courts online through a new web site which will be introduced by the Council this month.
  • Information Technology benefits for remote areas

    Bringing the advantages of computer technology to the community, and particularly local businesses, is the aim of Tambo Shire's Computer and Internet Awareness Raising program.
  • Exploring Perth with multi media kiosks

    The City of Perth has established a number of multi media kiosks providing improved customer communication 24 hours a day. These provide residents and visitors with easy, all day access to Council information, events and guides to the City.
  • Holistic approach to computer access

    Providing the benefits of new technology to disadvantaged groups is an aim of South Australia's City of Salisbury. Through a program known as the Salisbury Community Internet Access Project (SCIAP), Council is working in partnership with seven local community based groups. They include six neighbourhood houses and the Jack Young Centre for Seniors.
  • Award winning software saves money

    Faced with the requirements of the new Integrated Planning Act, Noosa Council set about developing a software application which would enable cost effective implementation of the changes. Its Integrated Planning Act Suite or 'One Stop IPA', provides a cost effective solution.
  • Time to take the next step

    In a Ministerial Statement to the Legislative Assembly in February, Northern Territory Minister for Local Government, Loraine Braham, said that, in many ways, the health of the community is closely related to the health and strength of Local Government. Acknowledging that the Territory's special brand of Local Government, namely Community Government, has served Territorians well, she said it is now time for reform. .
  • Strengthening Local Government in the Territory

    In welcoming delegates to the recent Local Government Reform Workshop at Pine Creek, President of the Local Government Association of Northern Territory (LGANT) Margaret Vigants said that she believed people would leave with a clearer understanding of why change is necessary. She said that Local Government in the Territory is currently only a shadow of what it can be in the future, that its full potential has not yet been realised.
  • Savings to be passed on to Local Government

    The Northern Territory Government has pledged that any savings resulting from a reduction in Council numbers, 'will be money available to Councils - it will not be realised by the Government'.
  • Wide consensus on reform agenda

    The Local Government Association of Northern Territory (LGANT) has prepared four Information Papers on the Reform Agenda. LGANT is committed to the reform agenda and will work cooperatively with the NT Government. However, it does not want to see boundary changes or amalgamations dominating the debate.
  • Great turnout to Joint Workshop at Pine Creek

    With over 110 delegates attending the Local Government Reform Workshop, conducted jointly by LGANT and the Department of Local Government, organisers were very pleased with the response.
  • Regional discussion groups

    David Coles, Assistant Secretary of the Department of Local Government, reaffirmed to delegates that the NT Government will not be using a 'one size fits all approach'. It is up to Councils to find a solution that best meets their own local needs.
  • Value of LGANT membership confirmed as Councils join in force

    Despite losing their membership subsidies from the Northern Territory Government, Community Government Councils have strenuously maintained their membership of the Local Government Association of the Northern Territory (LGANT).
  • Training for remote Councils

    The Remote Area Management Project (RAMP) continues to provide invaluable assistance to small isolated Aboriginal communities throughout the Northern Territory. The Program recognises that the usual opportunities for networking, conferencing and training programs that assist other Councils are not readily available in remote regions.  
  • Making the most of new technology

    Serving communities scattered across vast distances, Council's in the Territory often undertake duties and responsibilities not necessarily seen as Local Government's role elsewhere. For this reason, the Regional Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund (RTIF) has provided funding to LGANT to conduct a pilot program supplying Internet and email facilities to four isolated communities.
  • A code of conduct for a more professional approach

    The spectacle of rowdy scenes in Federal Parliament has often focused debate on the issue of how elected representatives should conduct themselves. Debate is the linchpin of decision making. In Local Government, as with other spheres of government, emotional outbursts are not uncommon.
  • Port Phillip's Y2K laboratory tests

    Victoria's City of Port Phillip is not waiting until the Year 2000 to find out if it has taken adequate precautions to prevent Y2K computer malfunction. Council has set up a laboratory to test its Y2K precautionary measures. The laboratory is a mini network with three computers and three servers already switched to the Year 2000.
  • Business as usual in Brisbane

    Unlike many private and public sector organisations, Brisbane City Council, the largest Local Government authority in Australia, has been working on Year 2000 compliance for over three years.

  • ALGA's submission to the Senate Tax Inquiry

    The Senate Select Committee Inquiry into a New Tax System has been taking submissions in capital cities around the nation. The Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) and its member State LGAs have taken every opportunity to raise a number of concerns on behalf of the 705 Councils and local communities they represent.
  • Self sufficiency pays off in Lajamanu

    Located more than 300 kilometres from the nearest source of employment, Lajamanu Community Government Council has looked at its own needs and resources to create a number of new job opportunities. Lajamanu is situated 600 kilometres south west of Katherine. It has a population of 1,100 people, however, almost 70% are aged under 25 years.
  • Editorial

    Like death and taxes, a further thing we have come to accept as inevitable is change. Change needs to be carefully planned and managed. Everyone involved must feel that they are part of the process and have ownership of it. Change imposed from the top down is likely to strike problems.
  • President's comment

    In each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Rosemary Craddock, President of the LGA in South Australia.  .
  • Involving young people in community activities

    With a growing population of young people, Maroochy Shire in Queensland is keen to involve its youth in community activities and decision making.
  • Transport scheme links services

    An absence of transport and the loss of many local offices for government services, has created multiple problems for people in the Barossa Valley District of South Australia. This led to the development of the Barossa Regional Community Transport Scheme.
  • Gosnells leads safety initiatives

    In 1997 a survey conducted by Western Australia's City of Gosnells revealed a concern common across Australia. People are increasingly worried for their personal safety and see community safety as their number one priority.
  • Youth viewpoints for all spheres of government

    Alice Springs Town Council Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) is giving young people a chance to have their say and influence the Town's direction.
  • Getting active in the International Year of Older Persons 1999

    Looking for a tangible way of highlighting the International Year of Older Persons in your area? Linking in with the Active Australia International Year of Older Persons project may be an option.
  • Single access point for business

    Local Government organisations are an integral part of an initiative to reduce the compliance burden on small business by introducing a single entry point to all levels of government. Through its involvement, Local Government is paving the way for greater uptake of its own online services, a more streamlined relationship with other Local Government bodies and, importantly, less paperwork.

  • $23 million Town Centre project

    A planned ring road around the Castle Hill Town Centre has created an opportunity for Council to redevelop this area into an attractive new community space.
  • Managing rapid growth

    Since 1993, Baulkham Hills Shire has released 5,000 new home lots. A further 9,000 lots will be released by 2004. Coping with a growth rate of around 4% per annum places a great strain on Council.
  • Partnerships ensure full use made of community facility

    Forging strong partnerships from the start of the project has enabled maximum use and community benefit from the $1.1 million Glenhaven Community Centre. The partnership included Baulkham Hills Shire Council, the Department of School Education and the local community.
  • Unique and fruitful partnership

    Council has entered into a formal partnership with the University of Western Sydney (UWS) to develop a social and environmental profile of the Local Government area. This is believed to be a first in Australia. .
  • Baulkham Hills Shire recognised for leadership and innovation

    Baulkham Hills Shire Council is an organisation reaching for the pinnacle of success. During 1997/98, its efforts have been acknowledged through a number of major awards and recognisedlevels of achievement.
  • Partnerships ensure full use made of community facility

    Forging strong partnerships from the start of the project has enabled maximum use and community benefit from the $1.1 million Glenhaven Community Centre. The partnership included Baulkham Hills Shire Council, the Department of School Education and the local community.
  • Unique and fruitful partnership

    Council has entered into a formal partnership with the University of Western Sydney (UWS) to develop a social and environmental profile of the Local Government area. This is believed to be a first in Australia. .
  • Cradle of Australia's wool industry gets $1 million boost

    Arguably the most significant farming property in Australia, Elizabeth Macarthur's Bella Vista Farm Park, is to benefit from major restoration works. The Farm was established in 1791, just three years after European settlement of Australia.
  • Proactive policy for young community

    With 25% of the population aged between 12 and 24, Baulkham Hills has one of the highest youth populations in NSW. To cater for the needs of its young people, Council offers a range of youth services. These aim to give local young people the opportunity to participate in and contribute to community life. .
  • Promoting business and growth

    The appointment of a Manager of Economic Development has seen a number of key projects come to fruition in Baulkham Hills. The aim of this appointment is to foster continued prosperity and economic development in the region, providing local job and business opportunities.
  • Service as usual at Hobart

    Hobart City Council General Manager, Brent Armstrong, is confident that Council will be able to provide 'service as usual' on the change to and into the next millennium.
  • Port Phillip's Y2K laboratory tests

    Victoria's City of Port Phillip is not waiting until the Year 2000 to find out if it has taken adequate precautions to prevent Y2K computer malfunction. Council has set up a laboratory to test its Y2K precautionary measures. The laboratory is a mini network with three computers and three servers already switched to the Year 2000.
  • Compliance for Council and suppliers

    NSW's Hurstville City Council is using 'The Year 2000 Business Risk Analysis Handbook' prepared by the State Government to guide its actions in minimising risks to services on the turn of the century.
  • Tackling customer service needs with GIS solution

    Victoria's Yarra Ranges Shire has combined a strategic move to Windows NT with an ambitious plan to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for customer enquiries. Yarra Ranges has moved its existing data to an NT based environment running a GIS solution from spatial systems provider, ERSIS.
  • Bringing new technology to the bush

    Introducing isolated people to the advantages of computer technology is the aim of an Internet Program being introduced in Victoria's Shire of Campaspe. Over the next two years, this will enable Council to establish 10 Internet sites in selected small communities around the Shire.
  • Ku-ring-gai provides services online with IBM E-business solution

    Residents in Ku-ring-gai Council will soon be able to interact with discussion groups, make requests for information and, in time, even submit development applications and book tennis courts online through a new web site which will be introduced by the Council this month.
  • Heartland E-Commerce

    A seminar to be held on 9 March at Dubbo in western NSW will inform Council's suppliers and other interested parties about the value of using electronic information systems for their commercial transactions. Partnerships with local business are becoming a vital component of Local Government activities. Helping Council's relationships with local businesses run more smoothly is the aim of the Central Economic Zone's Heartland Electronic Commerce Project.
  • Request register for easy tracking

    A Technical Services request tracking system has streamlined operations at Tasmania's Clarence City Council.
  • Baulkham Hills' continuous improvement journey

    From being technically insolvent in 1991, Baulkham Hills Shire Council has turned this situation around to now being recognised as an industry leader. Numerous awards during 1998, including the AR Bluett Award and the category winner of Organisational Practices in the 11th National Awards for Innovation in Local Government, are testament to this. .
  • Aiming to be the best pays off

    According to the Mayor, Doctor Geoff Brooke-Cowden, this is a most exciting time and Baulkham Hills is the most exciting place to be Mayor. The outstanding results can be attributed to a combined effort by Council, management, staff and the community. .

  • Local Government Professionals 'setting the pace'

    The third Annual Conference of Victoria's Local Government Professionals Inc (LG Pro) was staged on 18 and 19 February in Melbourne. Some 450 delegates, across the gambit of Local Government professional groupings, attended. Using the theme, 'Professionals Setting The Pace', the Conference organisers chose a program that aimed to ensure those present would return to their workplaces better equipped to 'share, innovate and grow'.
  • Editorial

    Like death and taxes, a further thing we have come to accept as inevitable is change. Change needs to be carefully planned and managed. Everyone involved must feel that they are part of the process and have ownership of it. Change imposed from the top down is likely to strike problems.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Brad Matheson, President of the Municipal Association of Victoria. .
  • Relaxed and comfortable with business

    A positive but relaxed approach to working with local business has brought widespread benefits to Victoria's Surf Coast Shire. Surf Coast is famous for what its name indicates, some of the best surf beaches in the world. Each year it hosts major international surfing events and plays host to thousands of holidaymakers. Surfing is the cornerstone of the local economy.
  • Hobart Skills Centre

    Faced with the need to find a new home when the site of Council's existing nursery was sold, the idea for establishing a larger regional nursery was developed. This also provided the opportunity to set up a regional work based training facility in keeping with the Federal Government's Training Reform Agenda.
  • Celebrating ageing in Shoalhaven

    Shoalhaven Council in NSW is celebrating the International year of Older Persons with a special Conference to discuss the issues associated with ageing and ways of making this a happy and positive time of life.
  • Speed gun slows motorists to safe speed

    'In a 12 month trial, Council is using the laser gun to display vehicle speeds and a slow down message. So far the trial has found drivers drop their speed by 4-12 kph when confronted with the graphic reminder. .
  • Marion wins KESAB Award

    n the face of some strong competition, the City of Marion took out the 1998 Keep South Australia Beautiful (KESAB) Metropolitan Council of the Year Award.
  • Warriparinga Interpretive Centre - a community reconciliation project

    The vision and efforts of local Kaurna people, Marion Council and the Marion community has led to the development of the Warriparinga Interpretive Centre. The aim is for the new Centre to be opened in 2001, as part of the celebrations marking the Centenary of Australia's Federation. The result will be an Aboriginal and European Heritage and Environmental Interpretive Centre of national significance.
  • Wetland an environmental asset

    Construction of a 1.8 hectare, $1.7 million wetland project in the City of Marion will provide far reaching benefits for the entire south western region of Adelaide. The Project has a number of important aims including conservation, passive recreation, environmental education, and improved water quality.
  • Getting active in the International Year of Older Persons 1999

    Looking for a tangible way of highlighting the International Year of Older Persons in your area? Linking in with the Active Australia International Year of Older Persons project may be an option.
  • Single access point for business

    Local Government organisations are an integral part of an initiative to reduce the compliance burden on small business by introducing a single entry point to all levels of government. Through its involvement, Local Government is paving the way for greater uptake of its own online services, a more streamlined relationship with other Local Government bodies and, importantly, less paperwork.