July 1998 Edition

  • State and Local Government taking up the challenge of change

    The public consultation phase of the Local Government legislative review is prompting lively discussion among Councils and communities around the State. A series of metropolitan and country information sessions and issues workshops follow the launch of the consultation documents.
  • SA hosts National Structural Reform Workshop

    Following widespread acclaim for its approach to structural reform, the South Australian Local Government Boundary Reform Board initiated and hosted a National Workshop on Structural Reform. Held in Adelaide last April, the Workshop profiled how each State and territory was dealing with structural reform, looking specifically at the advantages and disadvantages of various models.
  • Glen Eira updates aging systems

    Glen Eira City Council has recently selected a suite of enterprise applications from Computron Software. These include financials, workflow and COLD (Computer Output to Laser Disk), as well as payroll software from Peterborough and Stowe's Pathway Local Government property management product.
  • Data capture - on your bikes!

    When South Australia's City of West Torrens developed its asset management system it found both a high tech and low tech solution. The diversity and spread of Local Government assets, makes collecting the data the most expensive part of the exercise. Mountain bikes fitted with the GPS and data logger enable the user to collect information with ease from parks and other locations inaccessible to cars.
  • Restructuring gives greater emphasis to resource management

    The splitting of the former City of Wanneroo into two entities, the City of Joondalup and the Shire of Wanneroo, came into effect on 1 July. Equipping Business Unit Managers with the financial skills and information to make a difference in their area of operation, and repositioning both organisations in terms of asset management and achieving contestability, will be the central focus for 1998/99.
  • Self direction the driving factor for success

    Since its inception in early 1996, the Local Government Boundary Reform Board has overseen 34 voluntary amalgamations of South Australian Councils. This has reduced the number of Councils in South Australia from 118 to 69 in the most significant period of change in the State's Local Government history.
  • Consultation the hallmark of reform

    Extensive public consultation will continue to be a hallmark of reform in Local Government in South Australia as the State moves into a legislative review of the Local Government Act.
  • The SA model for change

    Rejecting the temptation of simply drawing lines on a map, the South Australian Government opted for a voluntary approach to structural reform. It provided the mechanism, through the Boundary Reform Board, to work in partnership with Local Government to achieve change.

  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a State Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Rosemary Craddock, Presidnet, Local Government Association of South Australia.
  • Amalgamation aids planning

    The City of Onkaparinga, established in July 1997, is South Australia's largest Council. It combines the former Councils of Happy Valley, Noarlunga and most of Willunga. There have been many benefits stemming from the amalgamation, not least being the opportunity to reduce rates by three percent. The amalgamation has also allowed for improved planning for the area as a whole.
  • New model visual arts museum in Ipswich

    Ipswich City Council believe's its revolutionary new museum known as Global Arts Link will take the arts world by storm. It is a crucial part of the revitalisation of the Ipswich Central Business District which aims at creating a dynamic union of culture heritage and business.
  • Television series to promote Central Australia

    Alice Springs Town Council, together with the Northern Territory Department of Asian Relations Trade and Industry and the Department of Arts and Museums, is about to enter the film industry. Their joint funding for the first two pilot episodes of a high quality television drama series set in the Centre is expected to promote economic growth, support employment and local skills development and encourage appreciation and use of the unique natural and cultural assets.
  • Major world conference has important messages for LG

    Local and State Government employees throughout Australia will have the opportunity to attend an international conference that will examine global developments in accessibility and transport for older people and people with disabilities.
  • Working out agreements - a practical guide

    'Working out Agreements: A Practical Guide to Agreements between Local Government an Indigenous Australians' was launched in Canberra on 3 June by the Hon Peter Baume AO, Professor of Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales and former Federal Minister for Aboriginal Affairs.
  • Making agreements central to the native title process

    The National Native Title Tribunal publishes a comprehensive guide on how to make agreements, with actual draft examples, on its Internet site at www.nntt.gov.au All information is provided free of charge, and can be downloaded from the site at Council offices and printed for circulation among elected representatives, staff and the public.
  • New Government for Qld

    Queensland's June 13 election result certainly attracted national and international coverage. With confirmation from Independent, Peter Wellington, that he will support Labor in regard to Supply Bills and Confidence Motions, Queensland again faces three years of minority Government.
  • Proposed changes to WA planning powers held over

    Legislation that would water down the ability of Western Australia's Councils to determine the nature and extent of future development in their area has been held over until the Spring session of Parliament.
  • Editorial

    The fact that almost one in four Queensland voters were prepared to move to the extreme right, electing candidates from a Party espousing, in the most part, sketchy policies, certainly has led to a rethink by the major Parties. For some years, Local Government has been trying to channel information through to the other spheres of government about what is happening in communities. The Australian Local Government Association has long argued that it is vital it is represented at key policy forming forums to feed through how policies are impacting on the ground and what people are saying. Maybe now the other spheres will finally sit up and take notice.

  • Working out agreements - a practical guide

    'Working out Agreements: A Practical Guide to Agreements between Local Government an Indigenous Australians' was launched in Canberra on 3 June by the Hon Peter Baume AO, Professor of Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales and former Federal Minister for Aboriginal Affairs.
  • Making agreements central to the native title process

    The National Native Title Tribunal publishes a comprehensive guide on how to make agreements, with actual draft examples, on its Internet site at www.nntt.gov.au All information is provided free of charge, and can be downloaded from the site at Council offices and printed for circulation among elected representatives, staff and the public.
  • Combined voice of Tas LG

    With the protracted review process and uncertainty of further amalgamations, the Local Government Association of Tasmania invited the Institute of Municipal Management, the Institute of Municipal Engineering Australia and the Local Government Community Development Association to join with it in staging a joint Annual Conference. Titled 'Local Government - A New Beginning', the combined Conference was a first for Australian Local Government.
  • Excellence recognised

    In recognition of the many ways people in Local Government are creatively responding to the needs of the communities they serve, the 1998 William Adams Boral Resources Local Government Awards for Excellence were presented at Tasmania's Local Government Annual Conference. Twenty-three entries were received, with Awards presented in four categories plus an Overall Award.
  • Editorial

    The fact that almost one in four Queensland voters were prepared to move to the extreme right, electing candidates from a Party espousing, in the most part, sketchy policies, certainly has led to a rethink by the major Parties. For some years, Local Government has been trying to channel information through to the other spheres of government about what is happening in communities. The Australian Local Government Association has long argued that it is vital it is represented at key policy forming forums to feed through how policies are impacting on the ground and what people are saying. Maybe now the other spheres will finally sit up and take notice.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a State Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Sue Smith MLC, President of the Local Government Association of Tasmania.
  • Coffs Harbour hosts national IT 98 Conference

    Coffs Harbour City Council, in association with the local Southern Cross University, will again host a national information technology conference in September. Titled 'Productivity, Power and Performance' the Conference has been specifically tailored to meet the needs of Local Government.
  • Tracking Australia's ancient history

    Although it is just over 200 years since European settlement, the pace of development, among other factors, has obliterated much evidence of Australia's ancient culture. This is particularly true in our major cities. But sites do still remain, even in built city environments, showing another way of life existed on this continent before the British arrived.
  • Geelong - smart move

    The City of Greater Geelong has appointed eleven highly accomplished, high profile, 'ambassadors' to promote the City's virtues and attract new residents and investment. Together with an extensive television advertising campaign, Council hopes the ambassadors will convince people from Melbourne and elsewhere that a shift down the Princes Highway has much to offer.
  • Towards Year 2000 compliance

    Governments, industry and private companies across the globe have been looking into the effect the Year 2000 date change problem will have. While the Year 2000 date change problem is raising different issues for corporate business, government, smaller enterprises and the general community, there is a single common thread that affects everyone. Time is running out!
  • Parramatta Road beyond 2000

    One of Sydney's oldest and most significant transport routes, Parramatta Road, is to be revamped. This major project will involve all Councils along the 23 kilometre stretch from The Broadway in Sydney to Church Street in Parramatta.

  • Council updates aging systems

    Glen Eira City Council has recently selected a suite of enterprise applications from Computron Software. These include financials, workflow and COLD (Computer Output to Laser Disk), as well as payroll software from Peterborough and Stowe's Pathway Local Government property management product.
  • Effective budgeting and financial control

    Holroyd City Council in NSW believes it has developed a new budgeting system which overcomes some of the problems associated with other systems. BUDSYS' advantages lie in its speed, clarity and ability to provide a standardised approach to budgeting.
  • Tribunal rules in favour of Special Charge

    Although rate capping has been eased to a certain extent in Victoria, finding the means to finance many projects is an ongoing issue of Councils. Special Charges, in particular, provide an important source of additional funds for projects which might not otherwise receive a budgetary allocation.
  • International award for Ballarat

    A new approach to asset management has seen the City of Ballarat win the prestigious AMQ International Award. Developed by Council's Infrastructure Planning Engineer, Phil Holloway, as part of the City's corporate planning process, the system aims to better manage infrastructure assets in an environment of tight economic constraints and increased external controls.
  • Self direction the driving factor for success

    Since its inception in early 1996, the Local Government Boundary Reform Board has overseen 34 voluntary amalgamations of South Australian Councils. This has reduced the number of Councils in South Australia from 118 to 69 in the most significant period of change in the State's Local Government history.
  • Consultation the hallmark of reform

    Extensive public consultation will continue to be a hallmark of reform in Local Government in South Australia as the State moves into a legislative review of the Local Government Act.
  • The SA model for change

    Rejecting the temptation of simply drawing lines on a map, the South Australian Government opted for a voluntary approach to structural reform. It provided the mechanism, through the Boundary Reform Board, to work in partnership with Local Government to achieve change.
  • State and Local Government taking up the challenge of change

    The public consultation phase of the Local Government legislative review is prompting lively discussion among Councils and communities around the State. A series of metropolitan and country information sessions and issues workshops follow the launch of the consultation documents.
  • SA hosts National Structural Reform Workshop

    Following widespread acclaim for its approach to structural reform, the South Australian Local Government Boundary Reform Board initiated and hosted a National Workshop on Structural Reform. Held in Adelaide last April, the Workshop profiled how each State and territory was dealing with structural reform, looking specifically at the advantages and disadvantages of various models.