June 1998 Edition

  • Customs and super information in BizLink

    BizLink can now help Australian Businesses with more information on Customs and on superannuation. Two new modules on these topics were released in March 1998. If you subscribe to BizLink, you don't have to ring, you don't have to visit, the information you need is on your computer.
  • $2.7 billion surplus yet communities still losing out

    Achieving the Budget surplus has come at a cost, not the least for Councils and the communities they serve. According to Councillor John Campbell, President of the Australian Local Government Association, the failure of the 1998 Budget to reverse last year's cuts to Local Government funding will mean ongoing reductions in services to local communities.
  • Editorial

    The Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) is rightly concerned that, in spite of the 1998 Budget delivering a $2.7 billion surplus, reductions in Local Government funding have not been restored. Cuts across the board, impacting on all sectors of the community, may be justified on the basis of needing to 'get back in the black', but for them to continue in light of a hefty surplus is open to challenge.
  • Graffiti free City

    Together with other community organisations, including Neighbourhood Watch, the local Police and Transit Police, South Australia's City of Marion has embarked on a campaign to reduce the incidence of unsightly graffiti.
  • Kempsey's CivicView has wide application for LG

    Kempsey Shire Council in NSW, with a reputation for an excellent working knowledge of the application of geographic information systems in a Local Government framework, has recently launched a new software package called CivicView. The technology has evolved from mapping into a complete package using a windows environment.
  • Katherine thanks Councils for their support

    Katherine Mayor, Jim Forscutt has thanked Councils around Australia for their support following devastating floods in January. Support came in the form of offers of plant and equipment, direct donations and donations raised through a special fund set up by the Australian Local Government Association.
  • Communities working together

    During the recent National Reconciliation Week, Alice Springs Public Library aided the cause by displaying a range of information, resources and other material to generate a greater understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.
  • Towards Year 2000 compliance

    Governments, industry and private companies across the globe have been looking into the effect the Year 2000 date change problem will have. While the Year 2000 date change problem is raising different issues for corporate business, government, smaller enterprises and the general community, there is a single common thread that affects everyone. Time is running out!
  • Showgrounds complex hosts year round events

    A joint project between Crow's Nest Shire Council and Crow's Nest Agricultural Society will result in better facilities for the Agricultural Society and local community.
  • Helping business get on with the job

    Governments at all levels across Australia are making it easier for small and medium-sized businesses to obtain helpful information, and reduce the amount of paperwork and the cost of dealing with government. Recent initiatives implemented by governments in the ACT, Tasmania and Victoria are making it easier for business to get the information they need, leaving them free to get on with the job.

  • Restoring Serpentine-Jarrahdale for tomorrow

    The Shire of Serpentine-Jarrahdale, Serpentine-Jarrahdale Land Conservation District Committee, ten community groups and Agriculture WA have embarked on an ambitious plan to clean up waterways and restore the once pristine environment of the Shire.
  • SA Councils lead the nation in Local Agenda 21

    According to State Environment Minister, Dorothy Kotz, Local Government in South Australia is leading the country in its response to Local Agenda 21. Local Agenda 21 emerged from the Rio Earth Summit where agreements were reached on strategies to alleviate global environmental problems.
  • Natural Resource Management through Bushcare

    Australian Local Governments have a unique role in improving natural resource management. While the specific roles and responsibilities of Local Governments differ between States, all Australian Councils have a range of regulatory and planning powers that influence the way in which local natural resources are managed.
  • Training saves the environment and cuts costs

    It is important that plant operators, construction workers and gardeners have access to information that can reduce adverse environmental impacts from Council works. Through training to reduce soil erosion, protect water quality and preserve native vegetation, Councils save the environment and costs arising from needing to compensate for damage, undertake repairs and rehabilitation schemes.
  • LG recognised on Greenhouse Council

    Recognition of Local Government as a key stakeholder on the State Greenhouse Council has been welcomed by the President of the Western Australian Municipal Association, Councillor Ken Pech.
  • Local Government praised for environment work

    In recent years, Local Government has played a major role in improving the management of natural resources in South Australia's Mount Lofty Ranges. The interaction between the Program and Local Government has influenced the quality of decision making by planning authorities and led to a greater level of consultation and cooperation on planning issues.
  • Lake restoration at Jabiru

    In Jabiru, in the Northern Territory, plans are afoot to restore Lake Jabiru to a state where it can be used for the passive recreational pursuits.
  • Denmark wins 1998 Tidy Town

    Denmark in Western Australia is the winner of the 1998 Mitsubishi Tidy Towns Award. After being a finalist three years in a row, Denmark is the first national winner from Western Australia. With a population of 4,000, the town has a very strong environmental ethos and a high degree of community involvement with 96 percent of residents participating in projects to improve the environment.
  • Campaspe wins National Landcare Award

    Victoria's Shire of Campaspe has won the Telstra National Landcare Award for its ongoing commitment to the preservation and management of the local environment.
  • Big wheels or little cogs diversity in Local Government

    In welcoming delegates to the Institute of Municipal Management's 17th National Congress, Federal President, Alf Mott said that the Congress is centered on Local Government achieving excellence through diversity. He said that as private sector corporations are focusing on specialisation to improve their performance and competitiveness, Local Government by its very nature is an extremely diverse industry.
  • Are we an economy or a society?

    Social activist, Rev Tim Costello, challenges the managerial approach that is permeating Local Government, particularly in regard to human services delivery and community development. He believes using words such as business units, markets and stakeholders, with citizenship being replaced by customers or consumers, is a big mistake.
  • Turning the governance map upside down

    Phillip Adams, renowned journalist and Chair of the Australia Day Council, said that every international and global problem comes home to roost exactly where you live. He believes that referring to Local Government as the 'third' tier of government is simply wrong. The map should be turned up the other way, with Local Government at the top.
  • Intellectual horsepower of LG

    Lord Mayor of Brisbane, Councillor Jim Soorley, described managers as the 'intellectual horsepower of Local Government'. Speaking on the topic, 'Local Government in the Context of an Australian Republic', he challenged managers to display their leadership in the reform agenda as Australia seeks out the best form of governance to lead us into the next millennium.
  • Yarra wins management challenge

    Victoria's City of Yarra has won the 1998 Australasian Active Learning Management Challenge. This year, 76 teams and 450 Local Government officers participated in this highly regarded annual professional development exercise.
  • Diverse challenges for CEOs

    Rolf Gerritsen, Professor of Local Government and Applied Policy at the University of Canberra, has recently participated in an international study of Local Government Chief Executive Officers. He said that the diversity in the role of Australian CEOs is partly due to the fact that we have eight separate Local Government systems. However, he believes a stronger factor is the bimodal culture difference between the rural and urban CEO.

  • Denmark wins 1998 Tidy Town

    Denmark in Western Australia is the winner of the 1998 Mitsubishi Tidy Towns Award. After being a finalist three years in a row, Denmark is the first national winner from Western Australia. With a population of 4,000, the town has a very strong environmental ethos and a high degree of community involvement with 96 percent of residents participating in projects to improve the environment.
  • Councils call for toxic waste inquiry

    Seven Councils in Melbourne's west and north west have joined together to call for a State Government Inquiry into the management, treatment and disposal of industrial waste.
  • Big wheels or little cogs diversity in Local Government

    In welcoming delegates to the Institute of Municipal Management's 17th National Congress, Federal President, Alf Mott said that the Congress is centered on Local Government achieving excellence through diversity. He said that as private sector corporations are focusing on specialisation to improve their performance and competitiveness, Local Government by its very nature is an extremely diverse industry.
  • Are we an economy or a society?

    Social activist, Rev Tim Costello, challenges the managerial approach that is permeating Local Government, particularly in regard to human services delivery and community development. He believes using words such as business units, markets and stakeholders, with citizenship being replaced by customers or consumers, is a big mistake.
  • Turning the governance map upside down

    Phillip Adams, renowned journalist and Chair of the Australia Day Council, said that every international and global problem comes home to roost exactly where you live. He believes that referring to Local Government as the 'third' tier of government is simply wrong. The map should be turned up the other way, with Local Government at the top.
  • Intellectual horsepower of LG

    Lord Mayor of Brisbane, Councillor Jim Soorley, described managers as the 'intellectual horsepower of Local Government'. Speaking on the topic, 'Local Government in the Context of an Australian Republic', he challenged managers to display their leadership in the reform agenda as Australia seeks out the best form of governance to lead us into the next millennium.
  • Yarra wins management challenge

    Victoria's City of Yarra has won the 1998 Australasian Active Learning Management Challenge. This year, 76 teams and 450 Local Government officers participated in this highly regarded annual professional development exercise.
  • Diverse challenges for CEOs

    Rolf Gerritsen, Professor of Local Government and Applied Policy at the University of Canberra, has recently participated in an international study of Local Government Chief Executive Officers. He said that the diversity in the role of Australian CEOs is partly due to the fact that we have eight separate Local Government systems. However, he believes a stronger factor is the bimodal culture difference between the rural and urban CEO.
  • Huon Valley's Healthy Rivers Project

    Formed in 1993 through the amalgamations of Esperance, Port Cygnet and Huon Councils, Huon Valley Council has made a concerted effort to support Landcare activities. This has primarily occurred under the umbrella of the Huon Healthy Rivers Project and a philosophy of integrated catchment management.
  • Natural Resource Management through Bushcare

    Australian Local Governments have a unique role in improving natural resource management. While the specific roles and responsibilities of Local Governments differ between States, all Australian Councils have a range of regulatory and planning powers that influence the way in which local natural resources are managed.
  • Solution for green waste

    Sydney's Concord Council recently hosted the launch of a new model for recycling garden waste called Garden to Garden. Developed by Waste Service NSW, Garden to Garden is part of the State Government's proposal to ban garden waste from entering landfill.
  • Manly launches conservation strategy

    The launch of its Conservation Strategy as part of Heritage Week has built ecological sustainability into every facet of Manly Council's activities for the next 10 years.
  • Changing emphasis reduces waste in Glenorchy

    Turning the emphasis from garbage collection to recycling has brought many benefits for Tasmania's City of Glenorchy. In a break with tradition, Council has decided to introduce recycling services on a weekly basis while reducing household garbage collection to a fortnightly service using 140 litre wheelie bins.
  • Campaspe wins National Landcare Award

    Victoria's Shire of Campaspe has won the Telstra National Landcare Award for its ongoing commitment to the preservation and management of the local environment.

  • $2.7 billion surplus yet communities still losing out

    Achieving the Budget surplus has come at a cost, not the least for Councils and the communities they serve. According to Councillor John Campbell, President of the Australian Local Government Association, the failure of the 1998 Budget to reverse last year's cuts to Local Government funding will mean ongoing reductions in services to local communities.
  • Editorial

    The Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) is rightly concerned that, in spite of the 1998 Budget delivering a $2.7 billion surplus, reductions in Local Government funding have not been restored. Cuts across the board, impacting on all sectors of the community, may be justified on the basis of needing to 'get back in the black', but for them to continue in light of a hefty surplus is open to challenge.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a State Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor John Jago, President of Victorian Local Governance Association.
  • Kempsey's CivicView has wide application for LG

    Kempsey Shire Council in NSW, with a reputation for an excellent working knowledge of the application of geographic information systems in a Local Government framework, has recently launched a new software package called CivicView. The technology has evolved from mapping into a complete package using a windows environment.
  • Burnie's City Link a winner

    While City Link will be familiar to Victorian readers as the name of the widesweeping infrastructure changes revolutionising road transport in Melbourne, in Burnie Tasmania, City Link refers to the road to better promotion of its Central Business District with Burnie City Council playing a pivotal role.
  • Council buys local industry

    Faced with the loss of a long standing local meat packing company, an industry generating employment for 130 people, and millions of dollars of cashflow, Victoria's Colac Otway Shire took the bold decision to buy the company.
  • Ashfield supports our Paralympians

    Following in the footsteps of Cairns City Council, which promoted community donations to support our Olympic athletes, Ashfield Council in Sydney is the first Council in Australia to become a Benefactor of the Paralympic Patrons' fund for the Paralympic Games in October 2000.
  • Intranet improves service

    A new 'Intranet' service launched this month by Waverley Council will give local residents and Council staff better access to in house information. It is also expected to reduce paper consumption by over 40 percent.
  • Helping business get on with the job

    Governments at all levels across Australia are making it easier for small and medium-sized businesses to obtain helpful information, and reduce the amount of paperwork and the cost of dealing with government. Recent initiatives implemented by governments in the ACT, Tasmania and Victoria are making it easier for business to get the information they need, leaving them free to get on with the job.
  • Customs and super information in BizLink

    BizLink can now help Australian Businesses with more information on Customs and on superannuation. Two new modules on these topics were released in March 1998. If you subscribe to BizLink, you don't have to ring, you don't have to visit, the information you need is on your computer.