February 1998 Edition

  • Fresh start for service delivery

    According to John Clay, General Manager, Service Planning and Contracts, the opportunity to review all Council services is a major benefit of amalgamation. In drawing Elizabeth and Munno Para together, a thorough review of all services provided by the two former Councils has helped establish the best means of delivering services in the future.
  • Strategy and policy iniatives

    Darryn Hartnett, General Manager Policy, Strategy and Advocacy, said that this division carries global responsibility for effective and efficient management of Council resources, strategic planning and community development across the full breadth of Council's operations. Being on the Purchaser side of the organisation, this division is responsible for establishing a service delivery model including the guidelines for operations and performance indicators.
  • Putting people first

    As a service provider, Council did not miss this chance to review and improve customer satisfaction levels. The opening of a new Customer Service Centre has received strong community support.
  • Centralising contract management

    For a consistent and streamlined approach to contract management, all Council's contracts will be managed and supervised by a new centralised unit. With work ranging from infrastructure through to consultancies being contracted out, the Contracts Unit places Playford in the box seat should legislation be introduced requiring Councils to market test more of their activities.
  • New broom in health and safety

    Last year when Mick Scarvelis took over the reins as CEO at Alice Springs Town Council, he decided this was an ideal time to undertake a comprehensive review of the organisation's occupational health and safety program. He saw it as an opportunity to look at an issue and involve everyone in a planning process.
  • Qld Safety Conference continues to grow

    Caloundra has been chosen as the venue for the 4th Annual Queensland Local Government Workplace Health and Safety State Conference. The Conference will be held at the impressive Caloundra Cultural Centre on 23 and 24 March 1998.
  • Promoting small farm safety

    At times a Council's interest in occupational health and safety may extend beyond the activities of its own workforce and into high risk occupations of residents in their Municipality. Three Councils on Melbourne's northern fringe have joined forces to appoint a Small Farm Safety Project Officer as part of a pilot program promoting safety on small farms.
  • Workplace safety winners

    A record number of South Australian Councils have received 'Outstanding Achievement' Awards for work accident prevention under the Local Government Association Workers Compensation Scheme. Seven Councils were recognised by the Scheme for achieving the top Level 3 rating from the State's WorkCover Safety Audits.
  • Learning safety on the Internet

    By the time people grow up and enter the workforce many poor attitudes and practices in regard to health and safety have already been established. An innovative program from WorkSafe Western Australia, and launched through the Town of Claremont Library and Information Service aims to change that.
  • Working with hazardous substances

    With the wide variety of materials used in many work places, the potential for an accumulation of fumes through poor work practice or storage facilities pose a real concern. Enware Australia Pty Limited has a wide range of both internal and external Dangerous Goods Stores from 50 litre capacity to 16 pallets for external storage, which comply to relevant Australian Standards.
  • Place to be in the future

    After some years discussing the possibility of amalgamation, the first Mayor of the new City of Playford, Marilyn Baker, says it is good to be one cohesive area. Now that the amalgamation has finally happened, there are many benefits to be realised for the whole community.
  • Building on many strengths

    With extensive experience from the Victorian restructure process, Tim Jackson was appointed Chief Executive Officer in February last year. Originally filling this position for the two former Councils, he has overseen the transition process and the first important year of the new Council.
  • Managing in a competitive environment

    The General Management Committee, comprising the Chief Executive Officer and five Managers, is responsible for formulating policy, implementing strategic initiatives and evaluating the City's progress. On a weekly basis, this Committee oversees day to day operations including the service review and performance indicators. It also deals with specific issues relating to human resources and public relations.
  • Greater productivity a winner

    The Enterprise Agreements, replacing four previous agreements of the two former Councils, is an excellent example of all parties being prepared to work together for a win win outcome. The Agreements have resulted in an across the board four percent salary increase.
  • Mapping a transition path

    From the outset, the two Councils identified the need for careful planning. The Transition Plan 1997/98 was the first step in the process. The Plan not only assisted the Councils to amalgamate, but ensured the new City had a definite focus for its formative first 12 months.
  • Preparing people for change

    Human relations issues are a vital component in the success of any amalgamation process. A new, larger entity provides numerous benefits for both Council and the community it serves. Not least of these is the opportunity to review all Council operations and how well it does things.
  • Community driven forward planning

    A participatory process, involving extensive input from key stakeholders, is shaping the future for the City of Playford. It will provide long term direction for Council on behalf of the community. Over 600 key players, representing the State Government, community groups and local business people, have been involved in developing Council's Strategic Plan - Playford 2010.

  • Cities for Climate Protection Campaign underway

    The Prime Minister's statement on Greenhouse gas reduction, prior to the international conference in Kyoto, saw the Cities for Climate Protection Campaign receive a welcome $13 million boost over the next five years.
  • Editorial

    With the recent Constitutional Convention turning a strong public focus on aspects of our system of government no longer relevant and other anomalies, Councillor Tom Pyne rightly argues (see President's Comment) that, if the Australian Constitution was written from scratch today, it is impossible to imagine Local Government not being included. At the same time, instances of State Governments having scant regard for Local Government and the communities they serve continue to mount.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a State Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Tom Pyne, President of Local Government Association of Queensland.
  • Tasmanian Devil arrives on mainland

    The gap between Tasmania and mainland Australia is narrowing further with the introduction of a new fast ferry catamaran service between George Town and Melbourne. The return of an alternative ferry service across Bass Strait is the result of years of intensive lobbying by the George Town Council, local media, the community and politicians.
  • National award for access program

    An innovative program ensuring all citizens have access to Council facilities has won Western Australia's Shire of Swan, a national award for Asset Management Excellence in the category of Local Government. The Disability Access Management System is a computer program which identifies and prioritises remedial works needed to ensure improved levels of access to facilities for all users, including people with disabilities.
  • Competition inspires ideas for town plan

    When Maroochy Shire Council in Queensland, decided to revamp the town of Buderim, it staged a competition to encourage a number of design teams to submit plans. This created an opportunity to consider a range of innovative visions for the future.
  • The complete answer to contract services

    SurfLink is Surf Coast Shire's innovative answer to the requirements of Compulsory Competitive Tendering and National Competition Policy. SurfLink is a highly professional organisation operating autonomously and generating local economic growth.
  • Partnership pays off

    With the aim of creating new business opportunities in growth industries, SurfLink has formed a strategic alliance with major international company Fuji Xerox. Net Press, SurfLink's digital printing and document management business, specialises in variable data document production. Ultimately, it expects to establish a national digital printing network.
  • Integrated business makes good sense

    A major part of SurfLink's business strategy is the development of integrated enterprises. Having identified information services as an area of potential growth, SurfLink set about building a corporate base in interlinked, technologically advanced industries.
  • Bunbury wins first WA quality award

    The City of Bunbury is the first Western Australian Council to be acknowledged in the Australian Quality Awards. The Award, for Commitment to Business Excellence, recognises Bunbury for having taken the first step towards an Australian Quality Award and its commitment to achieving excellence and creating a framework for change.
  • WA reform under the microscope

    In what is likely to be the first amalgamation under the current Western Australian boundary review process, at the instigation of both the Town and Shire of Albany, all Councillors have resigned, making way for the appointment of Commissioners to oversee the merger process.

  • Tas reform charts a rocky course

    The Tasmanian Local Government Boardıs Final Report, released on 16 January, has recommended that the State's 29 Councils be reduced to 11. Just four years since the last restructure, when Councils were reduced from 46 to the current 29, President of the Local Government Association of Tasmania (LGAT), Mayor Sue Smith, believes that Local Government in Tasmania has moved to Œregionalı government, and as far away from the individual as it can.
  • Cities for Climate Protection Campaign underway

    The Prime Minister's statement on Greenhouse gas reduction, prior to the international conference in Kyoto, saw the Cities for Climate Protection Campaign receive a welcome $13 million boost over the next five years. Currently over 200 cities, representing 100 million people worldwide are involved in the Campaign.
  • Editorial

    It is expected the Tasmania Government will not pursue the undemocratic path of locking local people and their representatives out of the reform process. The Government need only look across Bass Strait to see the fallout being experienced in some Councils resulting from the usurping of local democracy while State appointed Commissioners ran Local Government in Victoria.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a State Local Government Association President. The following is from Councillor Peter Woods, President NSW LGA.
  • Tasmanian Devil arrives on mainland

    The gap between Tasmania and mainland Australia is narrowing further with the introduction of a new fast ferry catamaran service between George Town and Melbourne. The return of an alternative ferry service across Bass Strait is the result of years of intensive lobbying by the George Town Council, local media, the community and politicians.
  • Eco Expo at Manly

    Mindful that its world famous beach is a priceless asset, Manly community in NSW held its fifth Manly Ocean Care Day in January. A highlight of the event was a new trade fair, Eco Expo, featuring environmental care products from over 40 commercial and government organisations.
  • The complete answer to contract services

    SurfLink is Surf Coast Shire's innovative answer to the requirements of Compulsory Competitive Tendering and National Competition Policy. SurfLink is a highly professional organisation operating autonomously and generating local economic growth.
  • Partnership pays off

    With the aim of creating new business opportunities in growth industries, SurfLink has formed a strategic alliance with major international company Fuji Xerox. Net Press, SurfLink's digital printing and document management business, specialises in variable data document production. Ultimately, it expects to establish a national digital printing network.
  • Integrated business makes good sense

    A major part of SurfLink's business strategy is the development of integrated enterprises. Having identified information services as an area of potential growth, SurfLink set about building a corporate base in interlinked, technologically advanced industries.
  • Cooperation the key to a sustainable future

    The desire to create a sustainable future in the face of increasing population and development has led the NSW Northern Rivers Regional Organisation of Councils (NOROC), together with other organisations, to cooperate in an unprecedented way to develop a Strategy for controlling change.

  • Staff safety leads to improved client care

    A fundamental respect for the people who undertake the demanding work of personal care is the basis of an innovative occupational health and safety program at Manningham City Council's Aged and Disability Support Services.
  • Promoting small farm safety

    At times a Council's interest in occupational health and safety may extend beyond the activities of its own workforce and into high risk occupations of residents in their Municipality. Three Councils on Melbourne's northern fringe have joined forces to appoint a Small Farm Safety Project Officer as part of a pilot program promoting safety on small farms.
  • Quality journey for better health and safety

    Occupational health and safety is a major beneficiary of the quality journey embarked upon by Wodonga City Council. Improved workplace health and safety is a major component of the quality system.
  • Safety program brings benefits to the whole community

    The implementation of a comprehensive occupational health and safety program at Circular Head Council in Tasmania has resulted in widespread benefits. Involving staff at every level of the program ensured that the target group were supportive of the process and would cooperate in safe practice.
  • Working with hazardous substances

    With the wide variety of materials used in many work places, the potential for an accumulation of fumes through poor work practice or storage facilities pose a real concern. Enware Australia Pty Limited has a wide range of both internal and external Dangerous Goods Stores from 50 litre capacity to 16 pallets for external storage, which comply to relevant Australian Standards.
  • Self management for workplace safety

    The basic principle of first aid is taking responsibility for one's own safety and not adding to the casualty list. This principle is at the heart of Brimbank City Council's structured approach to occupational health and safety.
  • Place to be in the future

    After some years discussing the possibility of amalgamation, the first Mayor of the new City of Playford, Marilyn Baker, says it is good to be one cohesive area. Now that the amalgamation has finally happened, there are many benefits to be realised for the whole community.
  • Building on many strengths

    With extensive experience from the Victorian restructure process, Tim Jackson was appointed Chief Executive Officer in February last year. Originally filling this position for the two former Councils, he has overseen the transition process and the first important year of the new Council.
  • Managing in a competitive environment

    The General Management Committee, comprising the Chief Executive Officer and five Managers, is responsible for formulating policy, implementing strategic initiatives and evaluating the City's progress. On a weekly basis, this Committee oversees day to day operations including the service review and performance indicators. It also deals with specific issues relating to human resources and public relations.
  • Greater productivity a winner

    The Enterprise Agreements, replacing four previous agreements of the two former Councils, is an excellent example of all parties being prepared to work together for a win win outcome. The Agreements have resulted in an across the board four percent salary increase.
  • Mapping a transition path

    From the outset, the two Councils identified the need for careful planning. The Transition Plan 1997/98 was the first step in the process. The Plan not only assisted the Councils to amalgamate, but ensured the new City had a definite focus for its formative first 12 months.
  • Preparing people for change

    Human relations issues are a vital component in the success of any amalgamation process. A new, larger entity provides numerous benefits for both Council and the community it serves. Not least of these is the opportunity to review all Council operations and how well it does things.
  • Community driven forward planning

    A participatory process, involving extensive input from key stakeholders, is shaping the future for the City of Playford. It will provide long term direction for Council on behalf of the community. Over 600 key players, representing the State Government, community groups and local business people, have been involved in developing Council's Strategic Plan - Playford 2010.
  • Fresh start for service delivery

    According to John Clay, General Manager, Service Planning and Contracts, the opportunity to review all Council services is a major benefit of amalgamation. In drawing Elizabeth and Munno Para together, a thorough review of all services provided by the two former Councils has helped establish the best means of delivering services in the future.
  • Strategy and policy iniatives

    Darryn Hartnett, General Manager Policy, Strategy and Advocacy, said that this division carries global responsibility for effective and efficient management of Council resources, strategic planning and community development across the full breadth of Council's operations. Being on the Purchaser side of the organisation, this division is responsible for establishing a service delivery model including the guidelines for operations and performance indicators.
  • Putting people first

    As a service provider, Council did not miss this chance to review and improve customer satisfaction levels. The opening of a new Customer Service Centre has received strong community support.
  • Centralising contract management

    For a consistent and streamlined approach to contract management, all Council's contracts will be managed and supervised by a new centralised unit. With work ranging from infrastructure through to consultancies being contracted out, the Contracts Unit places Playford in the box seat should legislation be introduced requiring Councils to market test more of their activities.