November 1996 Edition

  • Developing local communities

    In opening the Conference, Frank Hornby, National President Local Government Community Services Association Australia, said that the theme 'Developing Local Communities' accurately reflects the spirit of Local Government initiatives in community and cultural development. However, he warned that gains over the past three decades risk being negated with current public policy directions in Australia, especially the singular pursuit of increased competition and market force dominance.
  • Reconstructing society

    Keynote speaker at the Conference was Baptist Minister, Reverend Tim Costello. The last Mayor of the former City of St Kilda and community lawyer, Tim Costello is a well known, and often quoted, community advocate. He contends that the main task of government should be the nourishing of social capital and building of communities. However, the corrosive power of competition undermines social capital.
  • Reclaiming local governance from the 'eco rats'

    According to Jenny Wills, Director Social and Cultural Policy at the Municipal Association of Victoria, despite Local Government having a seat on the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), it is in grave danger of becoming locked out of our Federal system. Current COAG negotiations are restricted to the future of Commonwealth/State roles and relations in regard to Human Services. Local Government must become mobilised to defend communal values and promote civic participation in the planning and delivery of services.
  • Competition pros and cons

    A panel of speakers representing Local Government, the private sector and academia spoke on the issue of competition as it relates to Community Services provision. While productivity gains in Australian industry have been as high as 50 percent in some instances there is little evidence that the fruits of this have been adequately shared. Measures of GDP to date have been largely inadequate in assessing the actual quality of life people enjoy.
  • Community outcomes the key

    Rhonda Bignall, General Manager at Maitland City Council in NSW, gave an overview of her Council's approach to instituting reforms for increased competition. Unencumbered by the regulatory framework which has characterised the Victorian reforms, Maitland was able to conduct change in a way which was least destructive of staff morale, existing goodwill and community support.
  • Global perspectives

    Bill Armstrong, Executive Director of the Overseas Service Bureau, spoke on the topic 'Community Development - Global Issues'. He warned that the economic rationalist view of not seeing people in Asia but simply markets is fraught with danger. It is vital that the Australian community is fully aware of what it means to live in the Asia Pacific region and understand our neighbours.
  • Outback experience

    Boulia Shire in Central Far West Queensland covers some 63,000 square kilometres. Most if its 600 residents are involved in wool and beef production. Council, not content to rely purely on its traditional industries, it is taking an active role in promoting the region's unique history and lifestyle to tourists wanting to experience outback Australia first hand.
  • Masters Games great multiplier for Alice Springs

    From 19 to 27 October, Alice Springs hosted the 6th Honda Masters Games. Some 5,000 people, from across Australia, as well as competitors from New Zealand, USA and Hong Kong, travelled to the 'Centre' for this very popular biennial event.
  • Penola makes the most of its many tourist assets

    Fifteen years ago Penola was a drive through town, thought to offer little of interest to the visitor. Penola is now recognised nationally as one of South Australia's premier historic towns. Known not only for its location in the heart of the Coonawarra, it is a town with numerous historic buildings and sites and a close association with important colonial religious and literary figures.
  • Heritage business

    Fremantle is universally acknowledged as one of the most attractive cities in Australia with much to offer visitors and residents alike. However these attractions have been blunted somewhat by high unemployment which has ran at double the State average. Recognising that the principle employers of Australian workers are small businesses, Council has decided to actively promote this area of economic activity.

  • Planning for new millennium

    With an emphasis on a practical appreciation of planning, conservation and development, the recent National Congress of the Royal Australian Planning Institute (RAPI) had the appropriate theme 'Implementing the Vision: Reflections and Directions'. It attracted almost 500 delegates, with Councils represented from across the nation.
  • Editorial

    According to Dr Peter Ellyard, futures strategist and former Executive Director of the Australian Commission for the Future, solving current problems is simply not good enough. Dr Ellyard believes that 70 percent of job categories and products that will exist by the year 2020 are yet to be created. He said that the old ways are in trouble so new opportunities must be actively sought. Councils are ideally situated to lead their local areas in optimising all opportunities in a rapidly changing world. However, if they fail to look at the big picture, from a global perspective, they will sell themselves and their communities short.
  • Centenary celebrations at Port Hedland

    On 22 October 1996, the Town of Port Hedland celebrated its official Centenary. Situated in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, Port Hedland, the World's biggest iron ore port, is rich in mineral resources including salt, gold and magnesium.
  • Linking regions across Australia and the world

    RegionLink is an Internet based information exchange service. Developed for Voluntary Regional Organisations of Councils, it facilitates the exchange of information and discussion on topics of regional significance. Connections to RegionLink have been progressing steadily since the launch of the Internet site in December 1995.
  • Melbourne - A City for the arts

    With the recent launch of the City for the Arts action plan by Lord Mayor Ivan Deveson, Melbourne City Council has reaffirmed and expanded its commitment to the thriving cultural and artistic community for which Melbourne is famous. Under the Plan, Council has earmarked $21 million, over the next three years, to encourage and develop the City's many cultural strengths.
  • Benchmarking best practice in the arts

    For most Councils, while the arts are recognised as part of Local Government's responsibilities, they are rarely treated as central to day to day activities. Led by a visionary Council, Kate Brennan, Manager of Cultural Development and Marketing at the City of Melbourne and her team, take a different and more forward looking view.
  • Equitable workplaces

    Canning City Council in Western Australia has shown it can match it with the private sector when it comes to equitable workplace practices. Canning was one of two State winners in the Prime Minister's Employers of the Year Awards for 1996. The Awards, which attracted 358 nomiatons are designed to demostrate the achievements of people who have disabilities to fully partake in worthwhile productive employment alongside their able bodied colleagues.
  • SA's review of LG Act

    Running parallel with the restructure of Council boundaries in South Australia, a review of the Local Government Act 1934 and associated legislation is currently underway.

  • Community outcomes the key

    Rhonda Bignall, General Manager at Maitland City Council in NSW, gave an overview of her Council's approach to instituting reforms for increased competition. Unencumbered by the regulatory framework which has characterised the Victorian reforms, Maitland was able to conduct change in a way which was least destructive of staff morale, existing goodwill and community support.
  • Global perspectives

    Bill Armstrong, Executive Director of the Overseas Service Bureau, spoke on the topic 'Community Development - Global Issues'. He warned that the economic rationalist view of not seeing people in Asia but simply markets is fraught with danger. It is vital that the Australian community is fully aware of what it means to live in the Asia Pacific region and understand our neighbours.
  • Community approach to building the future

    Like many regional areas, Corangamite Shire in South West Victoria is concerned about its future. Working with the South West District Development Board, Council recently organised a two day forum titled, 'Building our Future'. The aim of this forum was to work with the local community to create a vision for the future.
  • Illawarra on the Internet

    The Illawarra Region of Councils, in conjunction with the Illawarra Office of Department of State and Regional Development, has established a regional presence on the Internet. Located at http://www.peg.apc.org/~iroc/, it has over 90 World Wide Web pages promoting the Illawarra and providing a profile of the region.
  • When beer means boom

    If towns do not have a natural tourist attraction, the solution is to make one. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Rural City of Wangaratta. Boorhaman, a tiny one pub township, 15 minutes north of Wangaratta, has caused a storm with its home brewed beer and the results are flowing in.
  • Developing local communities

    In opening the Conference, Frank Hornby, National President Local Government Community Services Association Australia, said that the theme 'Developing Local Communities' accurately reflects the spirit of Local Government initiatives in community and cultural development. However, he warned that gains over the past three decades risk being negated with current public policy directions in Australia, especially the singular pursuit of increased competition and market force dominance.
  • Reconstructing society

    Keynote speaker at the Conference was Baptist Minister, Reverend Tim Costello. The last Mayor of the former City of St Kilda and community lawyer, Tim Costello is a well known, and often quoted, community advocate. He contends that the main task of government should be the nourishing of social capital and building of communities. However, the corrosive power of competition undermines social capital.
  • Reclaiming local governance from the 'eco rats'

    According to Jenny Wills, Director Social and Cultural Policy at the Municipal Association of Victoria, despite Local Government having a seat on the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), it is in grave danger of becoming locked out of our Federal system. Current COAG negotiations are restricted to the future of Commonwealth/State roles and relations in regard to Human Services. Local Government must become mobilised to defend communal values and promote civic participation in the planning and delivery of services.
  • Competition pros and cons

    A panel of speakers representing Local Government, the private sector and academia spoke on the issue of competition as it relates to Community Services provision. While productivity gains in Australian industry have been as high as 50 percent in some instances there is little evidence that the fruits of this have been adequately shared. Measures of GDP to date have been largely inadequate in assessing the actual quality of life people enjoy.

  • Local communities 2010

    In opening the Municipal Association of Victoria's 117th Annual Session, President Cr Noel Bates said that anyone who believes that the Victorian Local Government reform process is nearing completion has less than a firm grip on reality. Currently representing 74 of Victoria's 78 Councils, he said that the MAV is very mindful of the difficulties being experienced by some Councils during this transition period.
  • Finding local leaders

    In recognising that the local community often possesses a wealth of untapped talent, Nillumbik Shire Council in Victoria has launched a program designed to identify and bring together current and future leaders from across the local community. The program is based on a range of practical exercises and workshops on various aspects of leadership within the context of global changes.
  • Editorial

    According to Dr Peter Ellyard, futures strategist and former Executive Director of the Australian Commission for the Future, solving current problems is simply not good enough. Dr Ellyard believes that 70 percent of job categories and products that will exist by the year 2020 are yet to be created. He said that the old ways are in trouble so new opportunities must be actively sought. Councils are ideally situated to lead their local areas in optimising all opportunities in a rapidly changing world. However, if they fail to look at the big picture, from a global perspective, they will sell themselves and their communities short.
  • Linking regions across Australia and the world

    RegionLink is an Internet based information exchange service. Developed for Voluntary Regional Organisations of Councils, it facilitates the exchange of information and discussion on topics of regional significance. Connections to RegionLink have been progressing steadily since the launch of the Internet site in December 1995.
  • Melbourne - A City for the arts

    With the recent launch of the City for the Arts action plan by Lord Mayor Ivan Deveson, Melbourne City Council has reaffirmed and expanded its commitment to the thriving cultural and artistic community for which Melbourne is famous. Under the Plan, Council has earmarked $21 million, over the next three years, to encourage and develop the City's many cultural strengths.
  • Benchmarking best practice in the arts

    For most Councils, while the arts are recognised as part of Local Government's responsibilities, they are rarely treated as central to day to day activities. Led by a visionary Council, Kate Brennan, Manager of Cultural Development and Marketing at the City of Melbourne and her team, take a different and more forward looking view.
  • Resource sharing moves up a notch

    Kentish and Latrobe Councils in north west Tasmania are taking resource sharing very seriously. The two Councils have already fully integrated their Engineering and Works programs. The Planning and Development Branch is also integrated with building, health and planning handled on a joint basis. The ultimate goal is to retain the individual identity of both Councils but, at the same time, provide the community with quality services in the most cost effective manner