Remote recycling

Article image - Remote recycling Roper Gulf Regional Council Roper Area Manager Janeen Bulsey, Principal Max Agnew, Trade Trainer Peter Tornaros and students involved in the innovative project.

Roper Gulf Regional Council in the Northern Territory is simultaneously encouraging recycling and up-skilling local students.

Recycling is a subject not often given due attention in remote parts of the Northern Territory, but talented students from Borroloola School are working with Roper Gulf Regional Council to put it at the forefront of the community’s mind.

The students unveiled 12 mesh recycling baskets last week, which were installed by the Council at strategic locations across the community in time for the 2017 Borroloola Show, including at the venue itself.

As Council’s push for viable rubbish recovery programs in its 186,000 square kilometre Local Government Area gathers momentum, Borroloola School Trade Trainer Peter Tornaros said the students had embraced the opportunity to develop their fabrication skills on a project that benefitted the community.

“A great need was discovered for materials to be recycled, so the school has worked with Council to design and manufacture the baskets, which have been put around Borroloola for residents to utilise.

“The project has helped instruct the students in the safe use of hand tools and welders, and they have taken great pride that something they have created will help to push the community in the direction of a recycling mindset.”

Mayor Tony Jack praised the school for its support of the Council’s plan to minimise the amount of recyclable materials being sent to Waste Management Facilities across the Roper Gulf region.

“Council is committed to creating sustainable rubbish recovery practices in remote communities, which will allow those materials that can be recycled to be reused, and lessen the amount of waste going into landfills.

“These kids are the future of Borroloola, so I’m proud to see them doing their part to make sure the community is clean, and to get people into the habit of thinking about their rubbish and what can be recycled.”