November 1999 Edition

  • Governing for Knox

    Mayor Karin Orpen is enthusiastic about the City of Knox, its residents and its future. She said the people of Knox are eager participants in community life. They value the wide open spaces, beautiful parks and reserves and spacious residential blocks that contribute to the Knox lifestyle.
  • On the way to Gold

    Entering the Australian Quality Awards (AQA) for the first time in 1998, Knox easily skipped the foundation stage and took out the second stage at the Business Excellence level.
  • Getting around becomes easier in Knox

    During Knox's early years, growth exceeded the provision of public transport and created long term problems for residents and Council. This has left a legacy of high dependence on car ownership.
  • Changing people's attitude to road safety

    Knox has received funding from Vicroads to commence a Road Safety Strategy for local thoroughfares.
  • Community ownership of the natural environment

    Situated at 'the gateway to the Dandenongs' Knox includes extensive areas of natural bushland, parks and creek valleys, at least one of which is home to a thriving family of platypus. With the clean and green feel of the City an important part of its attraction for residents and businesses Council is dedicated to preserving and enhancing the local environment through the Knox Conservation Strategy.
  • Drug proof your kids

    As with any community where there is a large number of families, the issue of young people and drugs cannot be ignored.
  • Life Stories

    While reports, surveys, data and statistics are all legitimate means to ascertain community values and aspirations, Knox has found one of the most agreeable ways to present information about the community, and its vision for Knox, is through the time honoured tradition of stories.
  • Riding in the tracks of Oppy

    Blessed with over 60 kilometres of bicycle tracks, Knox must have proved an ideal place to retire for Australia's most famous cyclist, the late Sir Hubert Opperman, OBE.
  • Planning for continual improvement

    The key to ensuring Knox's future reflects residents' and ratepayers' wishes is ongoing community and staff consultation.
  • $98 million win for Community

    As 'gaps' in residential development have been gradually filled, development sites in Knox have become relatively scarce. However creative thinking can bring exciting new opportunities. Council has recently signed an agreement with a private developer to build 'Waterford' a $98 million complex to be located on 40 hectares of unused land.
  • Cork provides an ideal European base

    Cork is the largest of Ireland's 30 County Councils. Marketing itself as 'the ideal European base', the County provides industrial sites, services and an infrastructure framework to attract new developments to locate there.
  • Tiger tales for tourists

    Since the last identified member of the species was shot in the north west district of the State in 1931, controversy has surrounded the supposed extinction of the thylacine, better known as the Tasmanian Tiger. Now visitors are being enticed to the region to share in the mystery by exploring the Tasmanian Tiger Trail courtesy of Waratah Wynyard Council and a group of local enthusiasts.
  • Trails bring multiple benefits

    Closed railway lines, old walking tracks and, in some cases, drainage lines in Western Australia are being recycled into an extensive network of trails for walking, cycling and horseriding.
  • Working Towns promote development

    Working Towns, an amalgamation of the former Regional Towns and Community at Work programs, is assisting South Australian communities to stimulate economic growth and employment by capitalising on local knowledge. Operating through Regional Development Boards, which include Local Government representatives, local businesses and community groups, the program funds initiatives which stimulate local economic development.
  • 'Acres of Opportunity' in Clifton

    Tucked away between Warwick and Toowoomba, the Shire of Clifton, population 2,500, has found its low key style to be a potential springboard in a campaign for revitalisation. First settled by Europeans in 1837, the towns of Clifton and Nobby remain intact as examples of early Australian rural life.
  • Areyonga - doing it for themselves

    When your community is located hundreds of kilometres from the nearest population centre there is often little point in relying on services from elsewhere to achieve improvement: hence the 'mission statement' of the remote Areyonga Community Council - 'We Did it our Way'.
  • Community support brings back services

    Inspired by the success of similar ventures in small towns elsewhere, Western Australia's Shire of Goomalling has reestablished banking services for its community of 1,100 people. Chief Executive Officer Clem Kerp said the establishment of the community bank has been a triumph of community action.
  • A City grows up

    Nestled at the base of Melbourne's Dandenong Ranges, Knox became a City in 1969. For over three decades it experienced rapid residential and industrial growth. Many young families moved here for the space, work and lifestyle opportunities on offer.

  • Modernising Britain - LG crucial

    Meeting in Newport, Wales, the Society of Local Authority Chief Executives (SOLACE) selected 'Under New Management' as the theme for its 1999 Annual Conference.
  • Editorial

    On a per capita basis, Australians are very much at the forefront for linking into the World Wide Web. Use of information kiosks linked to Council services, the ability for residents and ratepayers to do business with Council electronically, Intranet systems to enhance organisational communications and staff development, call centres to streamline residents' queries or complaints, plus state of the art software to maximise service delivery and management practices are all being taken up by Councils. However, within this 'brave new' information age there is the issue of the 'information rich' and 'information poor'.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Mayor Brian Hurn OAM, President of the Local Government Association of South Australia
  • Separating the executive and scrutiny functions

    The Blair Government's recent White Paper, 'Modern Local Government: In Touch with the People,' proposes changes to the traditional 'committee' decision making structure used by Councils in the United Kingdom.
  • Call for entries for Annual Report Awards*

    Organisations committed to excellence, accuracy and responsibility in reporting to stakeholders should enter the prestigious 2000 Annual Report Awards (ARA). Some of Australia's largest publicly listed companies, as well as many government and not for profit organisations, have accepted the Awards as the benchmark for excellence in annual reporting.
  • Orange stones to Mosman

    When Mosman City Council sent letters to all members of Australian Parliaments asking for stone contributions to its Federation Monument Project, the State Member for Orange and Orange City Councillor Russell Turner responded enthusiastically.
  • Community services conference challenges the value of economic rationalism

    Over 100 delegates who travelled to Adelaide for the first Local Government Community Services Association Conference to be held in South Australia for four years, heard about the impact economic rationalism is having at the local level.
  • The millennium bug - getting the messages out

    Local Governments around Australia have an important and active role to play in helping Australians understand and deal with the millennium bug, also called the Year 2000 issue or Y2K. Providing Australians with as many facts as possible on Y2K allows them to plan confidently for the New Year, and limits the potential for actions arising from uncertainty or panic.
  • Business Entry Point and Penrith City Council Streamlining Building and Development Applications

    With the help of the Federal Government, through the Business Entry Point Demonstration Program, Penrith City Council is developing a Building Application Development Application (BA/DA) system that will allow developers to submit and pay for Development Applications and Construction and Building Certificate Applications electronically.
  • Global Warming: Local Action

    Saving money on energy bills, cleaner air and more livable communities: these strong drivers explain why Cities for Climate Protection has taken off fast in Australia. Councils can have a strong influence over their communities' greenhouse emissions. Through their legislative responsibilities and links to the community, Councils can play a front line role.

  • Riding in the tracks of Oppy

    Blessed with over 60 kilometres of bicycle tracks, Knox must have proved an ideal place to retire for Australia's most famous cyclist, the late Sir Hubert Opperman, OBE.
  • Planning for continual improvement

    The key to ensuring Knox's future reflects residents' and ratepayers' wishes is ongoing community and staff consultation.
  • $98 million win for Community

    As 'gaps' in residential development have been gradually filled, development sites in Knox have become relatively scarce. However creative thinking can bring exciting new opportunities. Council has recently signed an agreement with a private developer to build 'Waterford' a $98 million complex to be located on 40 hectares of unused land.
  • Cork provides an ideal European base

    Cork is the largest of Ireland's 30 County Councils. Marketing itself as 'the ideal European base', the County provides industrial sites, services and an infrastructure framework to attract new developments to locate there.
  • Tiger tales for tourists

    Since the last identified member of the species was shot in the north west district of the State in 1931, controversy has surrounded the supposed extinction of the thylacine, better known as the Tasmanian Tiger. Now visitors are being enticed to the region to share in the mystery by exploring the Tasmanian Tiger Trail courtesy of Waratah Wynyard Council and a group of local enthusiasts.
  • Low rainfall forestry venture to spur growth

    Victoria's City of Greater Bendigo has embarked on a venture to promote commercial timber growing in its region. In October, Mayor Daryl McClure joined other Councillors in planting the first seedlings at the $220,000 Huntly Farm Forestry Project. These are the first of 150,000 native hardwoods to be planted at the site.
  • Dubbo celebrates 150 years

    In November the City of Dubbo will celebrate its 150th anniversary in style with a large array of events designed to appeal to families and people of all ages, tastes and interests.
  • Melton goes from strength to strength

    Only 35 minutes travel time west of Melbourne's CBD, the Shire of Melton is racing ahead with tourism and business developments in the region
  • Marketing a region

    Armed with the slogan, 'Europe wishes it had a region like Gippsland', Economic Development Officers from Victoria's South Gippsland, La Trobe, Wellington and Baw Baw Shires took local produce to Australia's largest food fair, 'Fine Food '99' held in Sydney in September.
  • A City grows up

    Nestled at the base of Melbourne's Dandenong Ranges, Knox became a City in 1969. For over three decades it experienced rapid residential and industrial growth. Many young families moved here for the space, work and lifestyle opportunities on offer.
  • Governing for Knox

    Mayor Karin Orpen is enthusiastic about the City of Knox, its residents and its future. She said the people of Knox are eager participants in community life. They value the wide open spaces, beautiful parks and reserves and spacious residential blocks that contribute to the Knox lifestyle.
  • On the way to Gold

    Entering the Australian Quality Awards (AQA) for the first time in 1998, Knox easily skipped the foundation stage and took out the second stage at the Business Excellence level.
  • Getting around becomes easier in Knox

    During Knox's early years, growth exceeded the provision of public transport and created long term problems for residents and Council. This has left a legacy of high dependence on car ownership.
  • Changing people's attitude to road safety

    Knox has received funding from Vicroads to commence a Road Safety Strategy for local thoroughfares.
  • Community ownership of the natural environment

    Situated at 'the gateway to the Dandenongs' Knox includes extensive areas of natural bushland, parks and creek valleys, at least one of which is home to a thriving family of platypus. With the clean and green feel of the City an important part of its attraction for residents and businesses Council is dedicated to preserving and enhancing the local environment through the Knox Conservation Strategy.
  • Drug proof your kids

    As with any community where there is a large number of families, the issue of young people and drugs cannot be ignored.
  • Life Stories

    While reports, surveys, data and statistics are all legitimate means to ascertain community values and aspirations, Knox has found one of the most agreeable ways to present information about the community, and its vision for Knox, is through the time honoured tradition of stories.

  • Modernising Britain - LG crucial

    Meeting in Newport, Wales, the Society of Local Authority Chief Executives (SOLACE) selected 'Under New Management' as the theme for its 1999 Annual Conference.
  • Editorial

    On a per capita basis, Australians are very much at the forefront for linking into the World Wide Web. Use of information kiosks linked to Council services, the ability for residents and ratepayers to do business with Council electronically, Intranet systems to enhance organisational communications and staff development, call centres to streamline residents' queries or complaints, plus state of the art software to maximise service delivery and management practices are all being taken up by Councils. However, within this 'brave new' information age there is the issue of the 'information rich' and 'information poor'.
  • President's comment

    Each edition we feature the views of a Local Government Association President. The following is from Chris Vardon President of the Shires Association of NSW.
  • Separating the executive and scrutiny functions

    The Blair Government's recent White Paper, 'Modern Local Government: In Touch with the People,' proposes changes to the traditional 'committee' decision making structure used by Councils in the United Kingdom.
  • Call for entries for Annual Report Awards*

    Organisations committed to excellence, accuracy and responsibility in reporting to stakeholders should enter the prestigious 2000 Annual Report Awards (ARA). Some of Australia's largest publicly listed companies, as well as many government and not for profit organisations, have accepted the Awards as the benchmark for excellence in annual reporting.
  • Benchmarking shows Councils are on the right track

    First impressions can be hard to budge and the first impression many residents and ratepayers have of their Council is formed when they telephone for information or to lodge a complaint. How that call is handled can have long term implications for customer relations. Melbourne City Council for one, is determined to find out just how well its Call Centre is performing. Customer Service Benchmarking Australia Pty Ltd provides Council with quarterly reports on Call Centre operations based on 'mystery caller' information.
  • Wyong Youth 2000

    In a bid to reduce the social and psychological problems that accompany having one of the highest youth unemployment rates in Australia, Wyong Shire Council has joined forces with the Salvation Army to create an innovative youth centre serving the central coast region.
  • State of uncertainty brings hope to Local Government

    The state of political uncertainty immediately following the recent Victorian State elections paradoxically gave cause for optimism at the Annual Conference of the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) held in early October.
  • Orange stones to Mosman

    When Mosman City Council sent letters to all members of Australian Parliaments asking for stone contributions to its Federation Monument Project, the State Member for Orange and Orange City Councillor Russell Turner responded enthusiastically.
  • The millennium bug - getting the messages out

    Local Governments around Australia have an important and active role to play in helping Australians understand and deal with the millennium bug, also called the Year 2000 issue or Y2K. Providing Australians with as many facts as possible on Y2K allows them to plan confidently for the New Year, and limits the potential for actions arising from uncertainty or panic.
  • Business Entry Point and Penrith City Council Streamlining Building and Development Applications

    With the help of the Federal Government, through the Business Entry Point Demonstration Program, Penrith City Council is developing a Building Application Development Application (BA/DA) system that will allow developers to submit and pay for Development Applications and Construction and Building Certificate Applications electronically.
  • Global Warming: Local Action

    Saving money on energy bills, cleaner air and more livable communities: these strong drivers explain why Cities for Climate Protection has taken off fast in Australia. Councils can have a strong influence over their communities' greenhouse emissions. Through their legislative responsibilities and links to the community, Councils can play a front line role.